Words whose 4th letter is G

Abigail (n.) A lady's waiting-maid.

Alignment (n.) The ground-plan of a railway or other road, in distinction from the grades or profile.

Amigo (n.) A friend; -- a Spanish term applied in the Philippine Islands to friendly natives.

Amygdaliferous (a.) Almond-bearing.

Amygdaloidal (a.) Almond-shaped.

Anaglyphical (a.) Pertaining to the art of chasing or embossing in relief; anaglyptic; -- opposed to diaglyptic or sunk work.

Anaglyptography (n.) The art of copying works in relief, or of engraving as to give the subject an embossed or raised appearance; -- used in representing coins, bas-reliefs, etc.

Anagram (n.) Literally, the letters of a word read backwards, but in its usual wider sense, the change or one word or phrase into another by the transposition of its letters. Thus Galenus becomes angelus; William Noy (attorney-general to Charles I., and a laborious man) may be turned into I moyl in law.

Apogeotropic (a.) Bending away from the ground; -- said of leaves, etc.

Badger (n.) An itinerant licensed dealer in commodities used for food; a hawker; a huckster; -- formerly applied especially to one who bought grain in one place and sold it in another.

Baggala (n.) A two-masted Arab or Indian trading vessel, used in Indian Ocean.

Bargain (n.) To make a bargain; to make a contract for the exchange of property or services; -- followed by with and for; as, to bargain with a farmer for a cow.

Bargainer (n.) One who makes a bargain; -- sometimes in the sense of bargainor.

Barge (n.) A double-decked passenger or freight vessel, towed by a steamboat.

Beggar (n.) One who is dependent upon others for support; -- a contemptuous or sarcastic use.

Beggarly (a.) In the condition of, or like, a beggar; suitable for a beggar; extremely indigent; poverty-stricken; mean; poor; contemptible.

Bergamot (n.) A tree of the Orange family (Citrus bergamia), having a roundish or pear-shaped fruit, from the rind of which an essential oil of delicious odor is extracted, much prized as a perfume. Also, the fruit.

Bergamot (n.) A coarse tapestry, manufactured from flock of cotton or hemp, mixed with ox's or goat's hair; -- said to have been invented at Bergamo, Italy. Encyc. Brit.

Bigg (n.) Barley, especially the hardy four-rowed kind.

Biggin (n.) A coffeepot with a strainer or perforated metallic vessel for holding the ground coffee, through which boiling water is poured; -- so called from Mr. Biggin, the inventor.

Biogeny (n.) A doctrine that the genesis or production of living organisms can take place only through the agency of living germs or parents; -- opposed to abiogenesis.

Blight (n.) Mildew; decay; anything nipping or blasting; -- applied as a general name to various injuries or diseases of plants, causing the whole or a part to wither, whether occasioned by insects, fungi, or atmospheric influences.

Blight (n.) A downy species of aphis, or plant louse, destructive to fruit trees, infesting both the roots and branches; -- also applied to several other injurious insects.

Bongrace (n.) A projecting bonnet or shade to protect the complexion; also, a wide-brimmed hat.

Bouget (n.) A charge representing a leather vessel for carrying water; -- also called water bouget.

Bongo (n.) Either of two large antelopes (Boocercus eurycercus of West Africa, and B. isaaci of East Africa) of a reddish or chestnut-brown color with narrow white stripes on the body. Their flesh is especially esteemed as food.

Brag (v. i.) To talk about one's self, or things pertaining to one's self, in a manner intended to excite admiration, envy, or wonder; to talk boastfully; to boast; -- often followed by of; as, to brag of one's exploits, courage, or money, or of the great things one intends to do.

Brig (n.) A two-masted, square-rigged vessel.

Brigand (n.) A light-armed, irregular foot soldier.

Brigantine (n.) A two-masted, square-rigged vessel, differing from a brig in that she does not carry a square mainsail.

Brig (n.) On a United States man-of-war, the prison or place of confinement for offenders.

Budge (n.) A kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on; -- used formerly as an edging and ornament, esp. of scholastic habits.

Bugger (n.) A wretch; -- sometimes used humorously or in playful disparagement.

Buggy (n.) A light one horse two-wheeled vehicle.

Buggy (n.) A light, four-wheeled vehicle, usually with one seat, and with or without a calash top.

Bung (v. t.) To stop, as the orifice in the bilge of a cask, with a bung; to close; -- with up.

Bungle (v. t.) To make or mend clumsily; to manage awkwardly; to botch; -- sometimes with up.

Burgall (n.) A small marine fish; -- also called cunner.

Burgee (n.) A swallow-tailed flag; a distinguishing pennant, used by cutters, yachts, and merchant vessels.

Burghmaster (n.) An officer who directs and lays out the meres or boundaries for the workmen; -- called also bailiff, and barmaster.

Chagrin (n.) To excite ill-humor in; to vex; to mortify; as, he was not a little chagrined.

Claggy (a.) Adhesive; -- said of a roof in a mine to which coal clings.

Coign (n.) A var. spelling of Coin, Quoin, a corner, wedge; -- chiefly used in the phrase coign of vantage, a position advantageous for action or observation.

Codger (n.) A singular or odd person; -- a familiar, humorous, or depreciatory appellation.

Conger (n.) The conger eel; -- called also congeree.

Congested (a.) Containing an unnatural accumulation of blood; hyperaemic; -- said of any part of the body.

Congiary (n.) A present, as of corn, wine, or oil, made by a Roman emperor to the soldiers or the people; -- so called because measured to each in a congius.

Conglomerate (n.) A rock, composed or rounded fragments of stone cemented together by another mineral substance, either calcareous, siliceous, or argillaceous; pudding stone; -- opposed to agglomerate. See Breccia.

Congregation (n.) The whole body of the Jewish people; -- called also Congregation of the Lord.

Congress (n.) A sudden encounter; a collision; a shock; -- said of things.

Cough (v. t.) To expel from the lungs or air passages by coughing; -- followed by up; as, to cough up phlegm.

Dagger (n.) A mark of reference in the form of a dagger [/]. It is the second in order when more than one reference occurs on a page; -- called also obelisk.

Daughter (n.) The female offspring of the human species; a female child of any age; -- applied also to the lower animals.

Daughter (n.) A son's wife; a daughter-in-law.

Deign (v. t.) To esteem worthy; to consider worth notice; -- opposed to disdain.

Deign (v. i.) To think worthy; to vouchsafe; to condescend; - - followed by an infinitive.

Dengue (n.) A specific epidemic disease attended with high fever, cutaneous eruption, and severe pains in the head and limbs, resembling those of rheumatism; -- called also breakbone fever. It occurs in India, Egypt, the West Indies, etc., is of short duration, and rarely fatal.

Diaglyphtic (a.) Represented or formed by depressions in the general surface; as, diaglyphic sculpture or engraving; -- opposed to anaglyphic.

Diggers (n. pl.) A degraded tribe of California Indians; -- so called from their practice of digging roots for food.

Diogenes (n.) A Greek Cynic philosopher (412?-323 B. C.) who lived much in Athens and was distinguished for contempt of the common aims and conditions of life, and for sharp, caustic sayings.

Disgavel (v. t.) To deprive of that principal quality of gavelkind tenure by which lands descend equally among all the sons of the tenant; -- said of lands.

Disgorge (v. t.) To give up unwillingly as what one has wrongfully seized and appropriated; to make restitution of; to surrender; as, he was compelled to disgorge his ill-gotten gains.

Disgregate (v. t.) To disperse; to scatter; -- opposite of congregate.

Disgust (v. t.) To provoke disgust or strong distaste in; to cause (any one) loathing, as of the stomach; to excite aversion in; to offend the moral taste of; -- often with at, with, or by.

Disgust (v. t.) Repugnance to what is offensive; aversion or displeasure produced by something loathsome; loathing; strong distaste; -- said primarily of the sickening opposition felt for anything which offends the physical organs of taste; now rather of the analogous repugnance excited by anything extremely unpleasant to the moral taste or higher sensibilities of our nature; as, an act of cruelty may excite disgust.

Dogger (n.) A two-masted fishing vessel, used by the Dutch.

Drag (v. t.) To draw slowly or heavily onward; to pull along the ground by main force; to haul; to trail; -- applied to drawing heavy or resisting bodies or those inapt for drawing, with labor, along the ground or other surface; as, to drag stone or timber; to drag a net in fishing.

Dragees (n. pl.) Sugar-coated medicines.

Dragoman (n.) An interpreter; -- so called in the Levant and other parts of the East.

Dragon (n.) A short musket hooked to a swivel attached to a soldier's belt; -- so called from a representation of a dragon's head at the muzzle.

Dragonet (n.) A small British marine fish (Callionymuslyra); -- called also yellow sculpin, fox, and gowdie.

Dudgeon (n.) A dudgeon-hafted dagger; a dagger.

Dung (v. t.) To immerse or steep, as calico, in a bath of hot water containing cow dung; -- done to remove the superfluous mordant.

Duograph (n.) A picture printed from two half-tone plates made with the screen set at different angles, and usually printed in two shades of the same color or in black and one tint.

Elegancy (n.) The state or quality of being elegant; beauty as resulting from choice qualities and the complete absence of what deforms or impresses unpleasantly; grace given by art or practice; fine polish; refinement; -- said of manners, language, style, form, architecture, etc.

Epigastric (a.) Over the stomach; -- applied to two of the areas of the carapace of crabs.

Epigene (a.) Foreign; unnatural; unusual; -- said of forms of crystals not natural to the substances in which they are found.

Epigene (a.) Formed originating on the surface of the earth; -- opposed to hypogene; as, epigene rocks.

Epignathous (a.) Hook-billed; having the upper mandible longer than the lower.

Epigynous (a.) Adnate to the surface of the ovary, so as to be apparently inserted upon the top of it; -- said of stamens, petals, sepals, and also of the disk.

Exegetist (n.) One versed in the science of exegesis or interpretation; -- also called exegete.

Exogamy (n.) The custom, or tribal law, which prohibits marriage between members of the same tribe; marriage outside of the tribe; -- opposed to endogamy.

Exogen (n.) A plant belonging to one of the greater part of the vegetable kingdom, and which the plants are characterized by having c wood bark, and pith, the wood forming a layer between the other two, and increasing, if at all, by the animal addition of a new layer to the outside next to the bark. The leaves are commonly netted-veined, and the number of cotyledons is two, or, very rarely, several in a whorl. Cf. Endogen.

Exogenous (a.) Pertaining to, or having the character of, an exogen; -- the opposite of endogenous.

Exogenous (a.) Growing from previously ossified parts; -- opposed to autogenous.

Fangle (v. t.) Something new-fashioned; a foolish innovation; a gewgaw; a trifling ornament.

Fergusonite (n.) A mineral of a brownish black color, essentially a tantalo-niobate of yttrium, erbium, and cerium; -- so called after Robert Ferguson.

Flag (n.) A cloth usually bearing a device or devices and used to indicate nationality, party, etc., or to give or ask information; -- commonly attached to a staff to be waved by the wind; a standard; a banner; an ensign; the colors; as, the national flag; a military or a naval flag.

Flagellant (n.) One of a fanatical sect which flourished in Europe in the 13th and 14th centuries, and maintained that flagellation was of equal virtue with baptism and the sacrament; -- called also disciplinant.

Flagitious (a.) Disgracefully or shamefully criminal; grossly wicked; scandalous; shameful; -- said of acts, crimes, etc.

Flagitious (a.) Guilty of enormous crimes; corrupt; profligate; -- said of persons.

Flag (n.) One of the wing feathers next the body of a bird; -- called also flag feather.

Flighted (a.) Taking flight; flying; -- used in composition.

Flighted (a.) Feathered; -- said of arrows.

Flugel (n.) A grand piano or a harpsichord, both being wing-shaped.

Forge (v. t.) To move heavily and slowly, as a ship after the sails are furled; to work one's way, as one ship in outsailing another; -- used especially in the phrase to forge ahead.

Forging (n.) A piece of forged work in metal; -- a general name for a piece of hammered iron or steel.

Forgive (v. t.) To give up resentment or claim to requital on account of (an offense or wrong); to remit the penalty of; to pardon; -- said in reference to the act forgiven.

Forgive (v. t.) To cease to feel resentment against, on account of wrong committed; to give up claim to requital from or retribution upon (an offender); to absolve; to pardon; -- said of the person offending.

Frogbit (n.) A European plant (Hydrocharis Morsus-ranae), floating on still water and propagating itself by runners. It has roundish leaves and small white flowers.

Frogfish (n.) An oceanic fish of the genus Antennarius or Pterophrynoides; -- called also mousefish and toadfish.

Frogmouth (n.) One of several species of Asiatic and East Indian birds of the genus Batrachostomus (family Podargidae); -- so called from their very broad, flat bills.

Frugality (n.) The quality of being frugal; prudent economy; that careful management of anything valuable which expends nothing unnecessarily, and applies what is used to a profitable purpose; thrift; --- opposed to extravagance.

Fudge (n.) A made-up story; stuff; nonsense; humbug; -- often an exclamation of contempt.

Fulgurata (n.) A spectro-electric tube in which the decomposition of a liquid by the passage of an electric spark is observed.

Fulgurating (a.) Resembling lightning; -- used to describe intense lancinating pains accompanying locomotor ataxy.

Fulguration (n.) The sudden brightening of a fused globule of gold or silver, when the last film of the oxide of lead or copper leaves its surface; -- also called blick.

Fungi (n. pl.) A group of thallophytic plants of low organization, destitute of chlorophyll, in which reproduction is mainly accomplished by means of asexual spores, which are produced in a great variety of ways, though sexual reproduction is known to occur in certain Phycomycetes, or so-called algal fungi.

Fungia (n.) A genus of simple, stony corals; -- so called because they are usually flat and circular, with radiating plates, like the gills of a mushroom. Some of them are eighteen inches in diameter.

Fungibles (n. pl.) Things which may be furnished or restored in kind, as distinguished from specific things; -- called also fungible things.

Fungivorous (a.) Eating fungi; -- said of certain insects and snails.

Fungus (n.) Any one of the Fungi, a large and very complex group of thallophytes of low organization, -- the molds, mildews, rusts, smuts, mushrooms, toadstools, puff balls, and the allies of each.

Gangway (v. i.) That part of the spar deck of a vessel on each side of the booms, from the quarter-deck to the forecastle; -- more properly termed the waist.

Garganey (n.) A small European duck (Anas querquedula); -- called also cricket teal, and summer teal.

Gauge (n.) Any instrument or apparatus for measuring the state of a phenomenon, or for ascertaining its numerical elements at any moment; -- usually applied to some particular instrument; as, a rain gauge; a steam gauge.

Gingham (n.) A kind of cotton or Goggle (a.) Full and rolling, or staring; -- said of the eyes.

Goggler (n.) A carangoid oceanic fish (Trachurops crumenophthalmus), having very large and prominent eyes; -- called also goggle-eye, big-eyed scad, and cicharra.

Gongorism (n.) An affected elegance or euphuism of style, for which the Spanish poet Gongora y Argote (1561-1627), among others of his time, was noted.

Gorgonzola (n.) A kind of Italian pressed milk cheese; -- so called from a village near Milan.

Gong (n.) A flat saucerlike bell, rung by striking it with a small hammer which is connected with it by various mechanical devices; a stationary bell, used to sound calls or alarms; -- called also gong bell.

Gorge (n.) The entrance into a bastion or other outwork of a fort; -- usually synonymous with rear. See Illust. of Bastion.

Gorgerin (n.) In some columns, that part of the capital between the termination of the shaft and the annulet of the echinus, or the space between two neck moldings; -- called also neck of the capital, and hypotrachelium. See Illust. of Column.

Gorget (n.) A small ornamental plate, usually crescent-shaped, and of gilded copper, formerly hung around the neck of officers in full uniform in some modern armies.

Gorget (n.) A grooved instrunent used in performing various operations; -- called also blunt gorget.

Gorget (n.) A crescent-shaped, colored patch on the neck of a bird or mammal.

Gougeshell (n.) A sharp-edged, tubular, marine shell, of the genus Vermetus; also, the pinna. See Vermetus.

Gregarin (n. pl.) An order of Protozoa, allied to the Rhizopoda, and parasitic in other animals, as in the earthworm, lobster, etc. When adult, they have a small, wormlike body inclosing a nucleus, but without external organs; in one of the young stages, they are amoebiform; -- called also Gregarinida, and Gregarinaria.

Grig (n.) The broad-nosed eel. See Glut.

Groggy (a.) Weakened in a fight so as to stagger; -- said of pugilists.

Groggy (a.) Moving in a hobbling manner, owing to ten der feet; -- said of a horse.

Haggard (a.) Having the expression of one wasted by want or suffering; hollow-eyed; having the features distorted or wasted, or anxious in appearance; as, haggard features, eyes.

Hang (v. i.) To suspend; to fasten to some elevated point without support from below; -- often used with up or out; as, to hang a coat on a hook; to hang up a sign; to hang out a banner.

Hang (v. i.) To fasten in a manner which will allow of free motion upon the point or points of suspension; -- said of a pendulum, a swing, a door, gate, etc.

Hang (v. i.) To put to death by suspending by the neck; -- a form of capital punishment; as, to hang a murderer.

Hang (v. i.) To cover, decorate, or furnish by hanging pictures trophies, drapery, and the like, or by covering with paper hangings; -- said of a wall, a room, etc.

Hang (v. i.) To hold for support; to depend; to cling; -- usually with on or upon; as, this question hangs on a single point.

Hang (v. i.) To hover; to impend; to appear threateningly; -- usually with over; as, evils hang over the country.

Hangbird (n.) The Baltimore oriole (Icterus galbula); -- so called because its nest is suspended from the limb of a tree. See Baltimore oriole.

Hanging (n.) That which is hung as lining or drapery for the walls of a room, as tapestry, paper, etc., or to cover or drape a door or window; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Hangman (n.) One who hangs another; esp., one who makes a business of hanging; a public executioner; -- sometimes used as a term of reproach, without reference to office.

Hedge (v. t.) To obstruct, as a road, with a barrier; to hinder from progress or success; -- sometimes with up and out.

Hedgehog (n.) A species of Medicago (M. intertexta), the pods of which are armed with short spines; -- popularly so called.

Hinge (v. i.) To stand, depend, hang, or turn, as on a hinge; to depend chiefly for a result or decision or for force and validity; -- usually with on or upon; as, the argument hinges on this point.

Hogging (n.) Drooping at the ends; arching;-in distinction from sagging.

Hungary (n.) A country in Central Europe, now a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Imagination (n.) The imagine-making power of the mind; the power to create or reproduce ideally an object of sense previously perceived; the power to call up mental imagines.

Imago (n.) The final adult, and usually winged, state of an insect. See Illust. of Ant-lion, and Army worm.

Isogonism (n.) The quality of having similar sexual zooids or gonophores and dissimilar hydrants; -- said of certain hydroids.

Jigging (n.) The act or using a jig; the act of separating ore with a jigger, or wire-bottomed sieve, which is moved up and down in water.

Kingfish (n.) An American marine food fish of the genus Menticirrus, especially M. saxatilis, or M. nebulosos, of the Atlantic coast; -- called also whiting, surf whiting, and barb.

Kinglihood (n.) King-Kingtruss () A truss, framed with a king-post; -- used in roofs, bridges, etc.

Knight (n.) In feudal times, a man-at-arms serving on horseback and admitted to a certain military rank with special ceremonies, including an oath to protect the distressed, maintain the right, and live a stainless life.

Knight (v. t.) To dub or create (one) a knight; -- done in England by the sovereign only, who taps the kneeling candidate with a sword, saying: Rise, Sir ---.

Lagging (n.) The clothing (esp., an outer, wooden covering), as of a steam cylinder, applied to prevent the radiation of heat; a covering of lags; -- called also deading and cleading.

Langarey (n.) One of numerous species of long-winged, shrikelike birds of Australia and the East Indies, of the genus Artamus, and allied genera; called also wood swallow.

Languaged (a.) Having a language; skilled in language; -- chiefly used in composition.

Langya (n.) One of several species of East Indian and Asiatic fresh-water fishes of the genus Ophiocephalus, remarkable for their power of living out of water, and for their tenacity of life; -- called also walking fishes.

Large (superl.) Exceeding most other things of like kind in bulk, capacity, quantity, superficial dimensions, or number of constituent units; big; great; capacious; extensive; -- opposed to small; as, a large horse; a large house or room; a large lake or pool; a large jug or spoon; a large vineyard; a large army; a large city.

Large (superl.) Having more than usual power or capacity; having broad sympathies and generous impulses; comprehensive; -- said of the mind and heart.

Large (superl.) Unrestrained by decorum; -- said of language.

Large (superl.) Crossing the Largo (a. & adv.) Slow or slowly; -- more so than adagio; next in slowness to grave, which is also weighty and solemn.

Laugh (v. t.) To express by, or utter with, laughter; -- with out.

Ledgment (n.) A string-course or horizontal suit of moldings, such as the base moldings of a building.

Legged (a.) Having (such or so many) legs; -- used in composition; as, a long-legged man; a two-legged animal.

Lengest (a.) Longer; longest; -- obsolete compar. and superl. of long.

Length (a.) A portion of space or of time considered as measured by its length; -- often in the plural.

Lengthen (v. t.) To extent in length; to make longer in extent or duration; as, to lengthen a Lengthy (superl.) Having length; rather long or too long; prolix; not brief; -- said chiefly of discourses, writings, and the like.

Linger (v. t.) To spend or pass in a lingering manner; -- with out; as, to linger out one's days on a sick bed.

Lingism (n.) A mode of treating certain diseases, as obesity, by gymnastics; -- proposed by Pehr Henrik Ling, a Swede. See Kinesiatrics.

Lingual (n.) A consonant sound formed by the aid of the tongue; -- a term especially applied to certain articulations (as those of t, d, th, and n) and to the letters denoting them.

Linguiform (a.) Having the form of the tongue; tongue-shaped.

Lodge (n.) The space at the mouth of a level next the shaft, widened to permit wagons to pass, or ore to be deposited for hoisting; -- called also platt.

Lodge (n.) A family of North American Indians, or the persons who usually occupy an Indian lodge, -- as a unit of enumeration, reckoned from four to six persons; as, the tribe consists of about two hundred lodges, that is, of about a thousand individuals.

Lodged (a.) Lying down; -- used of beasts of the chase, as couchant is of beasts of prey.

Lodging (n.) A place of rest, or of temporary habitation; esp., a sleeping apartment; -- often in the plural with a singular meaning.

Logged (a.) Made slow and heavy in movement; water-logged.

Loggerhead (n.) A very large marine turtle (Thalassochelys caretta, / caouana), common in the warmer parts of the Atlantic Ocean, from Brazil to Cape Cod; -- called also logger-headed turtle.

Loggia (n.) A roofed open gallery. It differs from a veranda in being more architectural, and in forming more decidedly a part of the main edifice to which it is attached; from a porch, in being intended not for entrance but for an out-of-door sitting-room.

Long (superl.) Drawn out in a Long (superl.) Far-reaching; extensive.

Long (superl.) Prolonged, or relatively more prolonged, in utterance; -- said of vowels and syllables. See Short, a., 13, and Guide to Pronunciation, // 22, 30.

Long (n.) The longest dimension; the greatest extent; -- in the phrase, the long and the short of it, that is, the sum and substance of it.

Long (adv.) Through an extent of time, more or less; -- only in question; as, how long will you be gone?

Long (a.) To feel a strong or morbid desire or craving; to wish for something with eagerness; -- followed by an infinitive, or by after or for.

Long (a.) To belong; -- used with to, unto, or for.

Longbow (n.) The ordinary bow, not mounted on a stock; -- so called in distinction from the crossbow when both were used as weapons of war. Also, sometimes, such a bow of about the height of a man, as distinguished from a much shorter one.

Longeval (a.) Long-loved; longevous.

Longhand (n.) The written characters used in the common method of writing; -- opposed to shorthand.

Longhorn (n.) A long-horned animal, as a cow, goat, or beetle. See Long-horned.

Longicorn (a.) Long-horned; pertaining to the Longicornia.

Longiloquence (n.) Long-windedness.

Longitude (n.) Length; measure or distance along the longest Longspun (a.) Spun out, or extended, to great length; hence, long-winded; tedious.

Longspur (n.) Any one of several species of fringilLough (n.) A loch or lake; -- so spelt in Ireland.

Lung (n.) An organ for aerial respiration; -- commonly in the plural.

Lungfish (n.) Any fish belonging to the Dipnoi; -- so called because they have both lungs and gills.

Lungoor (n.) A long-tailed monkey (Semnopithecus schislaceus), from the mountainous districts of India.

Lungwort (n.) An herb of the genus Pulmonaria (P. officinalis), of Europe; -- so called because the spotted appearance of the leaves resembles that of a diseased lung.

Margaryize (v. t.) To impregnate (wood) with a preservative solution of copper sulphate (often called Mar"ga*ry's flu"id [-r/z]).

Manganite (n.) One of the oxides of manganese; -- called also gray manganese ore. It occurs in brilliant steel-gray or iron-black crystals, also massive.

Margarate (n.) A compound of the so-called margaric acid with a base.

Margarous (a.) Margaric; -- formerly designating a supposed acid.

Margay (n.) An American wild cat (Felis tigrina), ranging from Mexico to Brazil. It is spotted with black. Called also long-tailed cat.

Marginicidal (a.) Dehiscent by the separation of united carpels; -- said of fruits.

Marguerite (n.) The daisy (Bellis perennis). The name is often applied also to the ox-eye daisy and to the China aster.

Midge (n.) Any one of many small, delicate, long-legged flies of the Chironomus, and allied genera, which do not bite. Their larvae are usually aquatic.

Misgive (v. t.) Specifically: To give doubt and apprehension to, instead of confidence and courage; to impart fear to; to make irresolute; -- usually said of the mind or heart, and followed by the objective personal pronoun.

Monger (n.) A trader; a dealer; -- now used chiefly in composition; as, fishmonger, ironmonger, newsmonger.

Monger (v. t.) To deal in; to make merchandise of; to traffic in; -- used chiefly of discreditable traffic.

Morganatic (a.) Pertaining to, in the manner of, or designating, a kind of marriage, called also left-handed marriage, between a man of superior rank and a woman of inferior, in which it is stipulated that neither the latter nor her children shall enjoy the rank or inherit the possessions of her husband.

Morgay (n.) The European small-spotted dogfish, or houndfish. See the Note under Houndfish.

Morgan (n.) One of a celebrated breed of American trotting horses; -- so called from the name of the stud from which the breed originated in Vermont.

Mungo (n.) A material of short fiber and inferior quality obtained by deviling woolen rags or the remnants of woolen goods, specif. those of felted, milled, or hard-spun woolen cloth, as distinguished from shoddy, or the deviled product of loose-textured woolen goods or worsted, -- a distinction often disregarded.

Nagging (a.) Fault-finding; teasing; persistently annoying; as, a nagging toothache.

nigged (n.) Hammer-dressed; -- said of building stone.

Nigger (n.) A negro; -- in vulgar derision or depreciation.

Oligist (a.) Hematite or specular iron ore; -- prob. so called in allusion to its feeble magnetism, as compared with magnetite.

Oligoclase (n.) A triclinic soda-lime feldspar. See Feldspar.

Oligomyold (a.) Having few or imperfect syringeal muscles; -- said of some passerine birds (Oligomyodi).

Onagrarieous (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, a natural order of plants (Onagraceae or Onagrarieae), which includes the fuchsia, the willow-herb (Epilobium), and the evening primrose (/nothera).

Origin (n.) The point of attachment or end of a muscle which is fixed during contraction; -- in contradistinction to insertion.

Outgo (n.) That which goes out, or is paid out; outlay; expenditure; -- the opposite of income.

Padge (n.) The barn owl; -- called also pudge, and pudge owl.

Pangolin (n.) Any one of several species of Manis, Pholidotus, and related genera, found in Africa and Asia. They are covered with imbricated scales, and feed upon ants. Called also scaly ant-eater.

Penguin (n.) The egg-shaped fleshy fruit of a West Indian plant (Bromelia Pinguin) of the Pineapple family; also, the plant itself, which has rigid, pointed, and spiny-toothed leaves, and is used for hedges.

Pergolo (n.) A continuous colonnade or arcade; -- applied to the decorative groups of windows, as in Venetian palazzi.

Piggin (n.) A small wooden pail or tub with an upright stave for a handle, -- often used as a dipper.

Plagal (a.) Having a scale running from the dominant to its octave; -- said of certain old church modes or tunes, as opposed to those called authentic, which ran from the tonic to its octave.

Plagionite (n.) A sulphide of lead and antimony, of a blackish lead-gray color and metallic luster.

Plagiostomi (n. pl.) An order of fishes including the sharks and rays; -- called also Plagiostomata.

Plight (n.) Condition; state; -- risk, or exposure to danger, often being implied; as, a luckless plight.

Plight (n.) To pledge; to give as a pledge for the performance of some act; as, to plight faith, honor, word; -- never applied to property or goods.

Pongo (n.) Any large ape; especially, the chimpanzee and the orang-outang.

Potgun (n.) A pot-shaped cannon; a mortar.

Prognathous (a.) Having the jaws projecting beyond the upper part of the face; -- opposed to orthognathous. See Gnathic index, under Gnathic.

Progne (n.) An American butterfly (Polygonia, / Vanessa, Progne). It is orange and black above, grayish beneath, with an L-shaped silver mark on the hind wings. Called also gray comma.

Progress (n.) Toward ideal completeness or perfection in respect of quality or condition; -- applied to individuals, communities, or the race; as, social, moral, religious, or political progress.

Progressionist (n.) One who maintains the doctrine of progression in organic forms; -- opposed to uniformitarian.

Progressive (a.) Moving forward; proceeding onward; advancing; evincing progress; increasing; as, progressive motion or course; -- opposed to retrograde.

Pugging (v. t.) Mortar or the like, laid between the joists under the boards of a floor, or within a partition, to deaden sound; -- in the United States usually called deafening.

Pungent (v. t.) Prickly-pointed; hard and sharp.

Pungled (a.) Shriveled or shrunken; -- said especially of grain which has lost its juices from the ravages of insects, such as the wheat midge, or Trips (Thrips cerealium).

Purge (v. t.) To remove in cleansing; to deterge; to wash away; -- often followed by away.

Pyrgom (n.) A variety of pyroxene; -- called also fassaite.

Rangy (v. i.) IncRagguled (a.) Notched in regular diagonal breaks; -- said of a Range (n.) To place (as a single individual) among others in a Range (v. i.) To have a certain direction; to correspond in direction; to be or keep in a corresponding Ridgeband (n.) The part of a harness which passes over the saddle, and supports the shafts of a cart; -- called also ridgerope, and ridger.

Ridgeling (n.) A half-castrated male animal.

Ringbill (n.) The ring-necked scaup duck; -- called also ring-billed blackhead. See Scaup.

Ringneck (n.) Any one of several species of small plovers of the genus Aegialitis, having a ring around the neck. The ring is black in summer, but becomes brown or gray in winter. The semipalmated plover (Ae. semipalmata) and the piping plover (Ae. meloda) are common North American species. Called also ring plover, and ring-necked plover.

Ringneck (n.) The ring-necked duck.

Ringtail (n.) A light sail set abaft and beyong the leech of a boom-and-gaff sail; -- called also ringsail.

Ringworm (n.) A contagious affection of the skin due to the presence of a vegetable parasite, and forming ring-shaped discolored patches covered with vesicles or powdery scales. It occurs either on the body, the face, or the scalp. Different varieties are distinguished as Tinea circinata, Tinea tonsurans, etc., but all are caused by the same parasite (a species of Trichophyton).

Rough (n.) Not level; having a broken surface; uneven; -- said of a piece of land, or of a road.

Rough (n.) Not polished; uncut; -- said of a gem; as, a rough diamond.

Rough (n.) Tossed in waves; boisterous; high; -- said of a sea or other piece of water.

Rough (n.) Marked by coarseness; shaggy; ragged; disordered; -- said of dress, appearance, or the like; as, a rough coat.

Rough (n.) Loud and hoarse; offensive to the ear; harsh; grating; -- said of sound, voice, and the like; as, a rough tone; rough numbers.

Rough (v. t.) To cut or make in a hasty, rough manner; -- with out; as, to rough out a carving, a sketch.

Roughleg (n.) Any one of several species of large hawks of the genus Archibuteo, having the legs feathered to the toes. Called also rough-legged hawk, and rough-legged buzzard.

Rugged (n.) Harsh; hard; crabbed; austere; -- said of temper, character, and the like, or of persons.

Rugged (n.) Rough to the ear; harsh; grating; -- said of sound, style, and the like.

Rugged (n.) Sour; surly; frowning; wrinkled; -- said of looks, etc.

Rugged (n.) Violent; rude; boisterrous; -- said of conduct, manners, etc.

Rugged (n.) Vigorous; robust; hardy; -- said of health, physique, etc.

Sangaree (n.) Wine and water sweetened and spiced, -- a favorite West Indian drink.

Sanguine (n.) Anything of a blood-red color, as cloth.

Sanguineous (a.) Blood-red; crimson.

Sanguivorous (a.) Subsisting upon blood; -- said of certain blood-sucking bats and other animals. See Vampire.

Sargo (n.) Any one of several species of sparoid fishes belonging to Sargus, Pomadasys, and related genera; -- called also sar, and saragu.

Sauger (n.) An American fresh-water food fish (Stizostedion Canadense); -- called also gray pike, blue pike, hornfish, land pike, sand pike, pickering, and pickerel.

Seagoing (a.) Going upon the sea; especially, sailing upon the deep sea; -- used in distinction from coasting or river, as applied to vessels.

Sergeant (n.) Formerly, in England, an officer nearly answering to the more modern bailiff of the hundred; also, an officer whose duty was to attend on the king, and on the lord high steward in court, to arrest traitors and other offenders. He is now called sergeant-at-arms, and two of these officers, by allowance of the sovereign, attend on the houses of Parliament (one for each house) to execute their commands, and another attends the Court Chancery.

Sergeant (n.) A lawyer of the highest rank, answering to the doctor of the civil law; -- called also serjeant at law.

Shagbark (n.) A rough-barked species of hickory (Carya alba), its nut. Called also shellbark. See Hickory.

Shagbark (n.) The West Indian Pithecolobium micradenium, a legiminous tree with a red coiled-up pod.

Siege (n.) The floor of a glass-furnace.

Singe (v. t.) To remove the nap of (cloth), by passing it rapidly over a red-hot bar, or over a flame, preliminary to dyeing it.

Single (v. i.) To take the irrregular gait called single-foot;- said of a horse. See Single-foot.

Single (n.) A game with but one player on each side; -- usually in the plural.

Singlet (n.) An unSingly (adv.) Without partners, companions, or associates; single-handed; as, to attack another singly.

Singular (a.) Denoting one person or thing; as, the singular number; -- opposed to dual and plural.

Singular (a.) Departing from general usage or expectations; odd; whimsical; -- often implying disapproval or consure.

Slight (superl.) Not decidedly marked; not forcible; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe; weak; gentle; -- applied in a great variety of circumstances; as, a slight (i. e., feeble) effort; a slight (i. e., perishable) structure; a slight (i. e., not deep) impression; a slight (i. e., not convincing) argument; a slight (i. e., not thorough) examination; slight (i. e., not severe) pain, and the like.

Slag (n.) A product of smelting, containing, mostly as silicates, the substances not sought to be produced as matte or metal, and having a lower specific gravity than the latter; -- called also, esp. in iron smelting, cinder. The slag of iron blast furnaces is essentially silicate of calcium, magnesium, and aluminium; that of lead and copper smelting furnaces contains iron.

Slug (n.) A thick strip of metal less than type high, and as long as the width of a column or a page, -- used in spacing out pages and to separate display Slug (v. i.) To become reduced in diameter, or changed in shape, by passing from a larger to a smaller part of the bore of the barrel; -- said of a bullet when fired from a gun, pistol, or other firearm.

Slugs (n. pl.) Half-roasted ore.

Snaggy (a.) Snappish; cross; ill-tempered.

Snug (v. i.) To lie close; to snuggle; to snudge; -- often with up, or together; as, a child snugs up to its mother.

Songster (n.) One who sings; one skilled in singing; -- not often applied to human beings.

Sorgne (n.) The three-beared rocking, or whistlefish.

Stag (n.) A castrated bull; -- called also bull stag, and bull seg. See the Note under Ox.

Stagger (n.) An unsteady movement of the body in walking or standing, as if one were about to fall; a reeling motion; vertigo; -- often in the plural; as, the stagger of a drunken man.

Stigma (v. t.) A small spot, mark, scar, or a minute hole; -- applied especially to a spot on the outer surface of a Graafian follicle, and to spots of intercellular substance in scaly epithelium, or to minute holes in such spots.

Stigmatic (n.) A person bearing the wounds on the hands and feet resembling those of Jesus Christ caused by His crucifixion; -- for true stigmantics the wounds are supposed to have been caused miraculously, as a sign of great hoStagy (a.) Having an air or manner characteristic of the stage; theatrical; artificial; as, a stagy tone or bearing; -- chiefly used depreciatively.

Subglottic (a.) Situated below the glottis; -- applied to that part of the cavity of the larynx below the true vocal cords.

Suggestion (n.) The act or power of originating or recalling ideas or relations, distinguished as original and relative; -- a term much used by Scottish metaphysicians from Hutcherson to Thomas Brown.

Swag (n.) A tramping bushman's luggage, rolled up either in canvas or in a blanket so as to form a long bundle, and carried on the back or over the shoulder; -- called also a bluey, or a drum.

Swagman (n.) A bushman carrying a swag and traveling on foot; -- called also swagsman, swagger, and swaggie.

Syngenesis (n.) A theory of generation in which each germ is supposed to contain the germs of all subsequent generations; -- the opposite of epigenesis.

Tangent (a.) meeting a curve or surface at a point and having at that point the same direction as the curve or surface; -- said of a straight Tangle (v.) An instrument consisting essentially of an iron bar to which are attached swabs, or bundles of frayed rope, or other similar substances, -- used to capture starfishes, sea urchins, and other similar creatures living at the bottom of the sea.

Tango (n.) A difficult dance in two-four time characterized by graceful posturing, frequent pointing positions, and a great variety of steps, including the cross step and turning steps. The dance is of Spanish origin, and is believed to have been in its original form a part of the fandango.

Teague (n.) An Irishman; -- a term used in contempt.

Tergeminous (a.) Threefold; thrice-paired.

Ting (n.) In Scandinavian countries, a legislative or judicial assembly; -- used, esp. in composition, in titles of such bodies. See Legislature, Norway.

Tongo (n.) The mangrove; -- so called in the Pacific Islands.

Tongs (n. pl.) An instrument, usually of metal, consisting of two parts, or long shafts, jointed together at or near one end, or united by an elastic bow, used for handling things, especially hot coals or metals; -- often called a pair of tongs.

Tongue (n.) Speech; words or declarations only; -- opposed to thoughts or actions.

Tonguester (n.) One who uses his tongue; a talker; a story-teller; a gossip.

Tonga (n.) A kind of light two-wheeled vehicle, usually for four persons, drawn by ponies or bullocks.

Tragopan (n.) Any one of several species of Asiatic pheasants of the genus Ceriornis. They are brilliantly colored with a variety of tints, the back and breast are usually covered with white or buff ocelli, and the head is ornamented with two bright-colored, fleshy wattles. The crimson tragopan, or horned pheasant (C. satyra), of India is one of the best-known species.

Trigamous (a.) Having three sorts of flowers in the same head, -- male, female, and hermaphrodite, or perfect, flowers.

Trigastric (a.) Having three bellies; -- said of a muscle.

Trigenic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid, C4H7N3O2, obtained, by the action of the vapor of cyanic acid on cold aldehyde, as a white crystalTrigraph (n.) Three letters united in pronunciation so as to have but one sound, or to form but one syllable, as -ieu in adieu; a triphthong.

Tungsten (n.) A rare element of the chromium group found in certain minerals, as wolfram and scheelite, and isolated as a heavy steel-gray metal which is very hard and infusible. It has both acid and basic properties. When alloyed in small quantities with steel, it greatly increases its hardness. Symbol W (Wolframium). Atomic weight, 183.6. Specific gravity, 18.

Turgid (a.) Distended beyond the natural state by some internal agent or expansive force; swelled; swollen; bloated; inflated; tumid; -- especially applied to an enlarged part of the body; as, a turgid limb; turgid fruit.

Urogastric (a.) Behind the stomach; -- said of two lobes of the carapace of certain crustaceans.

Usage (n.) Long-continued practice; customary mode of procedure; custom; habitual use; method.

Vengeance (n.) Punishment inflicted in return for an injury or an offense; retribution; -- often, in a bad sense, passionate or unrestrained revenge.

Verge (n.) The compass of the court of Marshalsea and the Palace court, within which the lord steward and the marshal of the king's household had special jurisdiction; -- so called from the verge, or staff, which the marshal bore.

Virgalieu (n.) A valuable kind of pear, of an obovate shape and with melting flesh of delicious flavor; -- more properly called White Doyenne.

Virgate (a.) Having the form of a straight rod; wand-shaped; straight and slender.

Virgin (n.) Any one of several species of gossamer-winged butterflies of the family Lycaenidae.

Virgin (v. i.) To act the virgin; to be or keep chaste; -- followed by it. See It, 5.

Virgularian (n.) Any one of numerous species of long, slender Alcyonaria belonging to Virgularia and allied genera of the family Virgularidae. These corals are allied to the sea-pens, but have a long rodlike rhachis inclosing a slender, round or square, calcareous axis. The polyps are arranged in transverse rows or clusters along each side of the rhachis.

Vulgate (a.) An ancient Latin version of the Scripture, and the only version which the Roman Church admits to be authentic; -- so called from its common use in the Latin Church.

Waggel (n.) The young of the great black-backed gull (Larus marinus), formerly considered a distinct species.

Waggery (n.) The manner or action of a wag; mischievous merriment; sportive trick or gayety; good-humored sarcasm; pleasantry; jocularity; as, the waggery of a schoolboy.

Wangan (n.) A boat for conveying provisions, tools, etc.; -- so called by Maine lumbermen.

Wedgebill (n.) An Australian crested insessorial bird (Sphenostoma cristatum) having a wedge-shaped bill. Its color is dull brown, like the earth of the plains where it lives.

Wedgy (a.) Like a wedge; wedge-shaped.

Weighbeam (n.) A kind of large steelyard for weighing merchandise; -- also called weighmaster's beam.

Whig (n.) A friend and supporter of the American Revolution; -- opposed to Tory, and Royalist.

Whiggamore (n.) A Whig; -- a cant term applied in contempt to Scotch Presbyterians.

Whigling (n.) A petty or inferior Whig; -- used in contempt.

Wing (n.) Any surface used primarily for supporting a flying machine in flight, whether by edge-on motion, or flapping, or rotation; specif., either of a pair of supporting planes of a flying machine.

Widgeon (n.) Any one of several species of fresh-water ducks, especially those belonging to the subgenus Mareca, of the genus Anas. The common European widgeon (Anas penelope) and the American widgeon (A. Americana) are the most important species. The latter is called also baldhead, baldpate, baldface, baldcrown, smoking duck, wheat, duck, and whitebelly.

Wiggery (n.) Any cover or screen, as red-tapism.

Wiggler (n.) The young, either larva or pupa, of the mosquito; -- called also wiggletail.

Wright (n.) One who is engaged in a mechanical or manufacturing business; an artificer; a workman; a manufacturer; a mechanic; esp., a worker in wood; -- now chiefly used in compounds, as in millwright, wheelwright, etc.

About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.