Words whose 4th letter is I

Abdicant (a.) Abdicating; renouncing; -- followed by of.

Abdicate (v. t.) To renounce; to relinquish; -- said of authority, a trust, duty, right, etc.

Abridge (v. t.) To deprive; to cut off; -- followed by of, and formerly by from; as, to abridge one of his rights.

Acciaccatura (n.) A short grace note, one semitone below the note to which it is prefixed; -- used especially in organ music. Now used as equivalent to the short appoggiatura.

Achieve (v. t.) To carry on to a final close; to bring out into a perfected state; to accomplish; to perform; -- as, to achieve a feat, an exploit, an enterprise.

Aclinic (a.) Without inclination or dipping; -- said the magnetic needle balances itself horizontally, having no dip. The aclinic Acrimonious (a.) Caustic; bitter-tempered' sarcastic; as, acrimonious dispute, language, temper.

Actinium (n.) A supposed metal, said by Phipson to be contained in commercial zinc; -- so called because certain of its compounds are darkened by exposure to light.

Action (n.) A share in the capital stock of a joint-stock company, or in the public funds; hence, in the plural, equivalent to stocks.

Actionist (n.) A shareholder in joint-stock company.

Active (a.) Having the power or quality of acting; causing change; communicating action or motion; acting; -- opposed to passive, that receives; as, certain active principles; the powers of the mind.

Active (a.) In action; actually proceeding; working; in force; -- opposed to quiescent, dormant, or extinct; as, active laws; active hostilities; an active volcano.

Active (a.) Given to action; constantly engaged in action; energetic; diligent; busy; -- opposed to dull, sluggish, indolent, or inert; as, an active man of business; active mind; active zeal.

Active (a.) Requiring or implying action or exertion; -- opposed to sedentary or to tranquil; as, active employment or service; active scenes.

Active (a.) Given to action rather than contemplation; practical; operative; -- opposed to speculative or theoretical; as, an active rather than a speculative statesman.

Active (a.) Applied to a form of the verb; -- opposed to passive. See Active voice, under Voice.

Addict (v. t.) To apply habitually; to devote; to habituate; -- with to.

Addition (n.) The act of adding two or more things together; -- opposed to subtraction or diminution.

Addition (n.) Something added to a coat of arms, as a mark of honor; -- opposed to abatement.

Additive (a.) Proper to be added; positive; -- opposed to subtractive.

Admirable (a.) Having qualities to excite wonder united with approbation; deserving the highest praise; most excellent; -- used of persons or things.

Admire (v. i.) To wonder; to marvel; to be affected with surprise; -- sometimes with at.

Advice (n.) Information or notice given; intelligence; as, late advices from France; -- commonly in the plural.

Advise (v. t.) To give information or notice to; to inform; -- with of before the thing communicated; as, we were advised of the risk.

Advise (v. t.) To take counsel; to consult; -- followed by with; as, to advise with friends.

Aegilops (n.) The great wild-oat grass or other cornfield weed.

Aegis (n.) A shield or protective armor; -- applied in mythology to the shield of Jupiter which he gave to Minerva. Also fig.: A shield; a protection.

Aeriferous (a.) Conveying or containing air; air-bearing; as, the windpipe is an aeriferous tube.

Affiliate (v. t.) To fix the paternity of; -- said of an illegitimate child; as, to affiliate the child to (or on or upon) one man rather than another.

Affiliate (v. t.) To attach (to) or unite (with); to receive into a society as a member, and initiate into its mysteries, plans, etc.; -- followed by to or with.

Affiliate (v. i.) To connect or associate one's self; -- followed by with; as, they affiliate with no party.

Affinity (n.) Relationship by marriage (as between a husband and his wife's blood relations, or between a wife and her husband's blood relations); -- in contradistinction to consanguinity, or relationship by blood; -- followed by with, to, or between.

Affirm (v. t.) To assert positively; to tell with confidence; to aver; to maintain as true; -- opposed to deny.

Affirmable (a.) Capable of being affirmed, asserted, or declared; -- followed by of; as, an attribute affirmable of every just man.

Affirmation (n.) The act of affirming or asserting as true; assertion; -- opposed to negation or denial.

Affirmative (a.) That affirms; asserting that the fact is so; declaratory of what exists; answering "yes" to a question; -- opposed to negative; as, an affirmative answer; an affirmative vote.

Affirmative (a.) Positive; -- a term applied to quantities which are to be added, and opposed to negative, or such as are to be subtracted.

Affirmative (n.) That which affirms as opposed to that which denies; an affirmative proposition; that side of question which affirms or maintains the proposition stated; -- opposed to negative; as, there were forty votes in the affirmative, and ten in the negative.

Affirmatively (adv.) In an affirmative manner; on the affirmative side of a question; in the affirmative; -- opposed to negatively.

Affix (v. t.) To fix or fasten figuratively; -- with on or upon; as, eyes affixed upon the ground.

Again (adv.) Once repeated; -- of quantity; as, as large again, half as much again.

Against (prep.) Abreast; opposite to; facing; towards; as, against the mouth of a river; -- in this sense often preceded by over.

Alliteration (n.) The repetition of the same letter at the beginning of two or more words immediately succeeding each other, or at short intervals; as in the following Almightiful (a.) All-powerful; almighty.

Almighty (a.) Unlimited in might; omnipotent; all-powerful; irresistible.

Altiloquent (a.) High-sounding; pompous in speech.

Altisonant (a.) High-sounding; lofty or pompous.

Ambidexter (n.) A double-dealer; one equally ready to act on either side in party disputes.

Ambidexterity (n.) Double-dealing.

Ambidextral (a.) Pertaining equally to the right-hand side and the left-hand side.

Ambilevous (a.) Left-handed on both sides; clumsy; -- opposed to ambidexter.

Ambiparous (a.) Characterized by containing the rudiments of both flowers and leaves; -- applied to a bud.

Ambitious (a.) Strongly desirous; -- followed by of or the infinitive; as, ambitious to be or to do something.

Ammite (n.) Oolite or roestone; -- written also hammite.

Antibacterial (a.) Inimical to bacteria; -- applied esp. to serum for protection against bacterial diseases.

Antimonsoon (n.) The upper, contrary-moving current of the atmosphere over a monsoon.

Ancient (a.) Old; that happened or existed in former times, usually at a great distance of time; belonging to times long past; specifically applied to the times before the fall of the Roman empire; -- opposed to modern; as, ancient authors, literature, history; ancient days.

Ancient (a.) Known for a long time, or from early times; -- opposed to recent or new; as, the ancient continent.

Ancile (n.) The sacred shield of the Romans, said to have-fallen from heaven in the reign of Numa. It was the palladium of Rome.

Ancipitous (a.) Two-edged instead of round; -- said of certain flattened stems, as those of blue grass, and rarely also of leaves.

Ancistroid (a.) Hook-shaped.

Artifact (n.) A product of human workmanship; -- applied esp. to the simpler products of aboriginal art as distinguished from natural objects.

Antic (n.) A buffoon or merry-andrew; one that practices odd gesticulations; the Fool of the old play.

Anticipant (a.) Anticipating; expectant; -- with of.

Anticlimax (n.) A sentence in which the ideas fall, or become less important and striking, at the close; -- the opposite of climax. It produces a ridiculous effect.

Antidote (n.) A remedy to counteract the effects of poison, or of anything noxious taken into the stomach; -- used with against, for, or to; as, an antidote against, for, or to, poison.

Antilogous (a.) Of the contrary name or character; -- opposed to analogous.

Antimonic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, antimony; -- said of those compounds of antimony in which this element has its highest equivalence; as, antimonic acid.

Antimonious (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, antimony; -- said of those compounds of antimony in which this element has an equivalence next lower than the highest; as, antimonious acid.

Antinomy (n.) A contradiction or incompatibility of thought or language; -- in the Kantian philosophy, such a contradiction as arises from the attempt to apply to the ideas of the reason, relations or attributes which are appropriate only to the facts or the concepts of experience.

Antipathetical (a.) Having a natural contrariety, or constitutional aversion, to a thing; characterized by antipathy; -- often followed by to.

Antiperistaltic (a.) Opposed to, or checking motion; acting upward; -- applied to an inverted action of the intestinal tube.

Antiquated (a.) Grown old. Hence: Bygone; obsolete; out of use; old-fashioned; as, an antiquated law.

Antirenter (n.) One opposed to the payment of rent; esp. one of those who in 1840-47 resisted the collection of rents claimed by the patroons from the settlers on certain manorial lands in the State of New York.

Antisolar (a.) Opposite to the sun; -- said of the point in the heavens 180? distant from the sun.

Antitoxine (n.) A substance (sometimes the product of a specific micro-organism and sometimes naturally present in the blood or tissues of an animal), capable of producing immunity from certain diseases, or of counteracting the poisonous effects of pathogenic bacteria.

Anxious (a.) Full of anxiety or disquietude; greatly concerned or solicitous, esp. respecting something future or unknown; being in painful suspense; -- applied to persons; as, anxious for the issue of a battle.

Anxious (a.) Accompanied with, or causing, anxiety; worrying; -- applied to things; as, anxious labor.

Aphilanthropy (n.) Want of love to mankind; -- the opposite of philanthropy.

AquiAquiparous (a.) Secreting water; -- applied to certain glands.

Argilliferous (a.) Producing clay; -- applied to such earths as abound with argil.

Arriere (n.) "That which is behind"; the rear; -- chiefly used as an adjective in the sense of behind, rear, subordinate.

Arris (n.) The sharp edge or salient angle formed by two surfaces meeting each other, whether plane or curved; -- applied particularly to the edges in moldings, and to the raised edges which separate the flutings in a Doric column.

Arrive (v. i.) To come to the shore or bank. In present usage: To come in progress by water, or by traveling on land; to reach by water or by land; -- followed by at (formerly sometimes by to), also by in and from.

Arsis (n.) The elevation of the hand, or that part of the bar at which it is raised, in beating time; the weak or unaccented part of the bar; -- opposed to thesis.

Artiad (a.) Even; not odd; -- said of elementary substances and of radicals the valence of which is divisible by two without a remainder.

Artiodactyla (n. pl.) One of the divisions of the ungulate animals. The functional toes of the hind foot are even in number, and the third digit of each foot (corresponding to the middle finger in man) is asymmetrical and paired with the fourth digit, as in the hog, the sheep, and the ox; -- opposed to Perissodactyla.

Artiodactylous (a.) Even-toed.

Ascidioidea (n. pl.) A group of Tunicata, often shaped like a two-necked bottle. The group includes, social, and compound species. The gill is a netlike structure within the oral aperture. The integument is usually leathery in texture. See Illustration in Appendix.

Ascidium (n.) A pitcher-shaped, or flask-shaped, organ or appendage of a plant, as the leaves of the pitcher plant, or the little bladderlike traps of the bladderwort (Utricularia).

Ascians (n. pl.) Persons who, at certain times of the year, have no shadow at noon; -- applied to the inhabitants of the torrid zone, who have, twice a year, a vertical sun.

Aspire (v. t.) To desire with eagerness; to seek to attain something high or great; to pant; to long; -- followed by to or after, and rarely by at; as, to aspire to a crown; to aspire after immorality.

Assibilation (n.) Change of a non-sibilant letter to a sibilant, as of -tion to -shun, duke to ditch.

Assiduity (n.) Studied and persevering attention to a person; -- usually in the plural.

Assignat (n.) One of the notes, bills, or bonds, issued as currency by the revolutionary government of France (1790-1796), and based on the security of the lands of the church and of nobles which had been appropriated by the state.

Assignation (n.) An appointment of time and place for meeting or interview; -- used chiefly of love interviews, and now commonly in a bad sense.

Assize (n.) The periodical sessions of the judges of the superior courts in every county of England for the purpose of administering justice in the trial and determination of civil and criminal cases; -- usually in the plural.

Assize (n.) The time or place of holding the court of assize; -- generally in the plural, assizes.

Atrip (adv.) Just hove clear of the ground; -- said of the anchor.

Atrip (adv.) Sheeted home, hoisted taut up and ready for trimming; -- said of sails.

Atrip (adv.) Hoisted up and ready to be swayed across; -- said of yards.

Attic (a.) A low story above the main order or orders of a facade, in the classical styles; -- a term introduced in the 17th century. Hence:

Aubin (n.) A broken gait of a horse, between an amble and a gallop; -- commonly called a Canterbury gallop.

Augite (n.) A variety of pyroxene, usually of a black or dark green color, occurring in igneous rocks, such as basalt; -- also used instead of the general term pyroxene.

Auric (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, gold; -- said of those compounds of gold in which this element has its higher valence; as, auric oxide; auric chloride.

Aurichalceous (a.) Brass-colored.

Auricle (n.) The chamber, or one of the two chambers, of the heart, by which the blood is received and transmitted to the ventricle or ventricles; -- so called from its resemblance to the auricle or external ear of some quadrupeds. See Heart.

Auricle (n.) An angular or ear-shaped lobe.

Auricled (a.) Having ear-shaped appendages or lobes; auriculate; as, auricled leaves.

Auricula (n.) A species of Primula, or primrose, called also, from the shape of its leaves, bear's-ear.

Auricula (n.) A species of Hirneola (H. auricula), a membranaceous fungus, called also auricula Judae, or Jew's-ear.

Auricula (n.) A genus of air-breathing mollusks mostly found near the sea, where the water is brackish

Auriferous (a.) Gold-bearing; containing or producing gold.

Auriform (a.) Having the form of the human ear; ear-shaped.

Aurin (n.) A red coloring matter derived from phenol; -- called also, in commerce, yellow corallin.

Aurivorous (a.) Gold-devouring.

Auxiliary (sing.) A verb which helps to form the voices, modes, and tenses of other verbs; -- called, also, an auxiliary verb; as, have, be, may, can, do, must, shall, and will, in English; etre and avoir, in French; avere and essere, in Italian; estar and haber, in Spanish.

Avoidance (n.) The act of becoming vacant, or the state of being vacant; -- specifically used for the state of a benefice becoming void by the death, deprivation, or resignation of the incumbent.

Aweigh (adv.) Just drawn out of the ground, and hanging perpendicularly; atrip; -- said of the anchor.

Axminster (n.) An Axminster carpet, an imitation Turkey carpet, noted for its thick and soft pile; -- so called from Axminster, Eng.

Axminster carpet () A variety of Turkey carpet, woven by machine or, when more than 27 inches wide, on a hand loom, and consisting of strips of worsted chenille so colored as to produce a pattern on a stout jute backing. It has a fine soft pile. So called from Axminster, England, where it was formerly (1755 -- 1835) made.

Axminster carpet () A similar but cheaper machine-made carpet, resembling moquette in construction and appearance, but finer and of better material.

Babillard (n.) The lesser whitethroat of Europe; -- called also babbling warbler.

Bacillary (a.) Of or pertaining to little rods; rod-shaped.

Bacilliform (a.) Rod-shaped.

Bacillus (n.) A variety of bacterium; a microscopic, rod-shaped vegetable organism.

Badiaga (n.) A fresh-water sponge (Spongilla), common in the north of Europe, the powder of which is used to take away the livid marks of bruises.

Banish (v. t.) To drive out, as from a home or familiar place; -- used with from and out of.

Barium (n.) One of the elements, belonging to the alkaBasin (n.) An isolated or circumscribed formation, particularly where the strata dip inward, on all sides, toward a center; -- especially applied to the coal formations, called coal basins or coal fields.

Babiism (n.) The doctrine of a modern religious pantheistical sect in Persia, which was founded, about 1844, by Mirza Ali Mohammed ibn Rabhik (1820 -- 1850), who assumed the title of Bab-ed-Din (Per., Gate of the Faith). Babism is a mixture of Mohammedan, Christian, Jewish, and Parsi elements. This doctrine forbids concubinage and polygamy, and frees women from many of the degradations imposed upon them among the orthodox Mohammedans. Mendicancy, the use of intoxicating liquors and drugs, and > Believer (n.) One who gives credit to the truth of the Scriptures, as a revelation from God; a Christian; -- in a more restricted sense, one who receives Christ as his Savior, and accepts the way of salvation unfolded in the gospel.

Benitier (n.) A holy-water stoup.

Besieger (n.) One who besieges; -- opposed to the besieged.

Bevilled (a.) Notched with an angle like that inclosed by a carpenter's bevel; -- said of a partition Bifilar (a.) Two-threaded; involving the use of two threads; as, bifilar suspension; a bifilar balance.

Bipinnaria (n.) The larva of certain starfishes as developed in the free-swimming stage.

Bisilicate (n.) A salt of metasilicic acid; -- so called because the ratio of the oxygen of the silica to the oxygen of the base is as two to one. The bisilicates include many of the most common and important minerals.

Bodice (n.) A close-fitting outer waist or vest forming the upper part of a woman's dress, or a portion of it.

Bodied (a.) Having a body; -- usually in composition; as, able-bodied.

Bogie (n.) A four-wheeled truck, having a certain amount of play around a vertical axis, used to support in part a locomotive on a railway track.

Boride (n.) A binary compound of boron with a more positive or basic element or radical; -- formerly called boruret.

Boviform (a.) Resembling an ox in form; ox-shaped.

Brail (v. t.) To haul up by the brails; -- used with up; as, to brail up a sail.

Brain (n.) The whitish mass of soft matter (the center of the nervous system, and the seat of consciousness and volition) which is inclosed in the cartilaginous or bony cranium of vertebrate animals. It is simply the anterior termination of the spinal cord, and is developed from three embryonic vesicles, whose cavities are connected with the central canal of the cord; the cavities of the vesicles become the central cavities, or ventricles, and the walls thicken unequally and become the three s> Brainish (a.) Hot-headed; furious.

Bruin (a.) A bear; -- so called in popular tales and fables.

Burion (n.) The red-breasted house sparrow of California (Carpodacus frontalis); -- called also crimson-fronted bullfinch.

Business (n.) Affair; concern; matter; -- used in an indefinite sense, and modified by the connected words.

Buxine (n.) An alkaloid obtained from the Buxus sempervirens, or common box tree. It is identical with bebeerine; -- called also buxina.

Calibre (n.) The diameter of the bore, as a cannon or other firearm, or of any tube; or the weight or size of the projectile which a firearm will carry; as, an 8 inch gun, a 12-pounder, a 44 caliber.

Calico (a.) Made of, or having the appearance of, calico; -- often applied to an animal, as a horse or cat, on whose body are large patches of a color strikingly different from its main color.

Calicoback (n.) An hemipterous insect (Murgantia histrionica) which injures the cabbage and other garden plants; -- called also calico bug and harlequin cabbage bug.

Calipers (n. pl.) An instrument, usually resembling a pair of dividers or compasses with curved legs, for measuring the diameter or thickness of bodies, as of work shaped in a lathe or planer, timber, masts, shot, etc.; or the bore of firearms, tubes, etc.; -- called also caliper compasses, or caliber compasses.

Caliph (n.) Successor or vicar; -- a title of the successors of Mohammed both as temporal and spiritual rulers, now used by the sultans of Turkey.

Camisard (n.) One of the French Protestant insurgents who rebelled against Louis XIV, after the revocation of the edict of Nates; -- so called from the peasant's smock (camise) which they wore.

Canister (n.) A kind of case shot for cannon, in which a number of lead or iron balls in layers are inclosed in a case fitting the gun; -- called also canister shot.

Capias (n.) A writ or process commanding the officer to take the body of the person named in it, that is, to arrest him; -- also called writ of capias.

Capillaire (n.) A sirup prepared from the maiden-hair, formerly supposed to have medicinal properties.

Capillary (n.) A minute, thin-walled vessel; particularly one of the smallest blood vessels connecting arteries and veins, but used also for the smallest lymphatic and biliary vessels.

Cariccio (n.) A piece in a free form, with frequent digressions from the theme; a fantasia; -- often called caprice.

Cariama (n.) A large, long-legged South American bird (Dicholophus cristatus) which preys upon snakes, etc. See Seriema.

Carinaria (n.) A genus of oceanic heteropod Mollusca, having a thin, glassy, bonnet-shaped shell, which covers only the nucleus and gills.

Carinatae (n. pl.) A grand division of birds, including all existing flying birds; -- So called from the carina or keel on the breastbone.

Cariole (n.) A small, light, open one-horse carriage

Cation (n.) An electro-positive substance, which in electro-decomposition is evolved at the cathode; -- opposed to anion.

Caviar (n.) The roes of the sturgeon, prepared and salted; -- used as a relish, esp. in Russia.

Cerise (a.) Cherry-colored; a light bright red; -- applied to textile fabrics, especially silk.

Cerite (n.) A gastropod shell belonging to the family Cerithiidae; -- so called from its hornlike form.

Cerite (n.) A mineral of a brownish of cherry-red color, commonly massive. It is a hydrous silicate of cerium and allied metals.

Chain (n.) Iron links bolted to the side of a vessel to bold the dead-eyes connected with the shrouds; also, the channels.

Chair (n.) A vehicle for one person; either a sedan borne upon poles, or two-wheeled carriage, drawn by one horse; a gig.

Chaise (n.) A two-wheeled carriage for two persons, with a calash top, and the body hung on leather straps, or thorough-braces. It is usually drawn by one horse.

Chrisom (n.) A child which died within a month after its baptism; -- so called from the chrisom cloth which was used as a shroud for it.

Christcross (n.) The mark of the cross, as cut, painted, written, or stamped on certain objects, -- sometimes as the sign of 12 o'clock on a dial.

Christian (n.) One of a sect (called Christian Connection) of open-communion immersionists. The Bible is their only authoritative rule of faith and practice.

Civil (a.) Subject to government; reduced to order; civilized; not barbarous; -- said of the community.

Civil (a.) Performing the duties of a citizen; obedient to government; -- said of an individual.

Clairaudience (n.) Act of hearing, or the ability to hear, sounds not normally audible; -- usually claimed as a special faculty of spiritualistic mediums, or the like.

Claik (n.) The bernicle goose; -- called also clack goose.

Cloisonne (a.) Inlaid between partitions: -- said of enamel when the Coaita (n.) The native name of certain South American monkeys of the genus Ateles, esp. A. paniscus. The black-faced coaita is Ateles ater. See Illustration in Appendix.

Comitiva (n.) A body of followers; -- applied to the lawless or brigand bands in Italy and Sicily.

Cobia (n.) An oceanic fish of large size (Elacate canada); the crabeater; -- called also bonito, cubbyyew, coalfish, and sergeant fish.

Conium (n.) A genus of biennial, poisonous, white-flowered, umbelliferous plants, bearing ribbed fruit ("seeds") and decompound leaves.

Coping (n.) The highest or covering course of masonry in a wall, often with sloping edges to carry off water; -- sometimes called capping.

Cotinga (n.) A bird of the family Cotingidae, including numerous bright-colored South American species; -- called also chatterers.

Croissante (a.) Terminated with crescent; -- said of a cross the ends of which are so terminated.

Cruiser (n.) One who, or a vessel that, cruises; -- usually an armed vessel.

Cruiser (n.) A man-of-war less heavily armed and armored than a battle ship, having great speed, and generally of from two thousand to twelve thousand tons displacement.

Cubism (n.) A movement or phase in post-impressionism (which see, below).

Cubilose (n.) A mucilagenous secretion of certain birds found as the characteristic ingredient of edible bird's-nests.

Culiciform (a.) Gnat-shaped.

Cuminol (n.) A liquid, C3H7.C6H4.CHO, obtained from oil of caraway; -- called also cuminic aldehyde.

Cuniform (a.) Wedge-shaped; as, a cuneiform bone; -- especially applied to the wedge-shaped or arrowheaded characters of ancient Persian and Assyrian inscriptions. See Arrowheaded.

Cuniform (a.) Pertaining to, or versed in, the ancient wedge-shaped characters, or the inscriptions in them.

Cuniform (n.) The wedge-shaped characters used in ancient Persian and Assyrian inscriptions.

Cuniform (n.) One of the carpal bones usually articulating with the ulna; -- called also pyramidal and ulnare.

Curia (n.) The Roman See in its temporal aspects, including all the machinery of administration; -- called also curia Romana.

Curious (a.) Careful or anxious to learn; eager for knowledge; given to research or inquiry; habitually inquisitive; prying; -- sometimes with after or of.

Cylindroid (n.) A certain surface of the third degree, described by a moving straight Cynical (a.) Given to sneering at rectitude and the conduct of life by moral principles; disbelieving in the reality of any human purposes which are not suggested or directed by self-interest or self-indulgence; as, a cynical man who scoffs at pretensions of integrity; characterized by such opinions; as, cynical views of human nature.

Cynic (n.) One who holds views resembling those of the Cynics; a snarler; a misanthrope; particularly, a person who believes that human conduct is directed, either consciously or unconsciously, wholly by self-interest or self-indulgence, and that appearances to the contrary are superficial and untrustworthy.

Dative (a.) Removable, as distinguished from perpetual; -- said of an officer.

Davit (n.) A spar formerly used on board of ships, as a crane to hoist the flukes of the anchor to the top of the bow, without injuring the sides of the ship; -- called also the fish davit.

Davit (n.) Curved arms of timber or iron, projecting over a ship's side of stern, having tackle to raise or lower a boat, swing it in on deck, rig it out for lowering, etc.; -- called also boat davits.

Demit (v. i.) To lay down or relinquish an office, membership, authority, or the like; to resign, as from a Masonic lodge; -- generally used with an implication that the act is voluntary.

Desiccator (n.) A short glass jar fitted with an air-tight cover, and containing some desiccating agent, as calcium chloride, above which is placed the material to be dried or preserved from moisture.

Debit (n.) A debt; an entry on the debtor (Dr.) side of an account; -- mostly used adjectively; as, the debit side of an account.

Debit (v. t.) To charge with debt; -- the opposite of, and correlative to, credit; as, to debit a purchaser for the goods sold.

Decillion (n.) According to the English notation, a million involved to the tenth power, or a unit with sixty ciphers annexed; according to the French and American notation, a thousand involved to the eleventh power, or a unit with thirty-three ciphers annexed. [See the Note under Numeration.]

Decimosexto (n.) A book consisting of sheets, each of which is folded into sixteen leaves; hence, indicating, more or less definitely, a size of book; -- usually written 16mo or 16?.

Decine (n.) One of the higher hydrocarbons, C10H15, of the acetylene series; -- called also decenylene.

Dedicatee (n.) One to whom a thing is dedicated; -- correlative to dedicator.

Deliberate (a.) Weighing facts and arguments with a view to a choice or decision; carefully considering the probable consequences of a step; circumspect; slow in determining; -- applied to persons; as, a deliberate judge or counselor.

Deliberate (a.) Formed with deliberation; well-advised; carefully considered; not sudden or rash; as, a deliberate opinion; a deliberate measure or result.

Deliberate (v. i.) To take counsel with one's self; to weigh the arguments for and against a proposed course of action; to reflect; to consider; to hesitate in deciding; -- sometimes with on, upon, about, concerning.

Delicate (a.) Fine or slender; minute; not coarse; -- said of a thread, or the like; as, delicate cotton.

Delicate (a.) Slight or smooth; light and yielding; -- said of texture; as, delicate lace or silk.

Delicate (a.) Soft and fair; -- said of the skin or a surface; as, a delicate cheek; a delicate complexion.

Delicate (a.) Light, or softly tinted; -- said of a color; as, a delicate blue.

Delicate (a.) Refined; gentle; scrupulous not to trespass or offend; considerate; -- said of manners, conduct, or feelings; as, delicate behavior; delicate attentions; delicate thoughtfulness.

Delicate (a.) Tender; not able to endure hardship; feeble; frail; effeminate; -- said of constitution, health, etc.; as, a delicate child; delicate health.

Delight (v. t.) A high degree of gratification of mind; a high- wrought state of pleasurable feeling; lively pleasure; extreme satisfaction; joy.

Delight (v. i.) To have or take great delight or pleasure; to be greatly pleased or rejoiced; -- followed by an infinitive, or by in.

Delirious (a.) Having a delirium; wandering in mind; light-headed; insane; raving; wild; as, a delirious patient; delirious fancies.

Delirium (n.) A state in which the thoughts, expressions, and actions are wild, irregular, and incoherent; mental aberration; a roving or wandering of the mind, -- usually dependent on a fever or some other disease, and so distinguished from mania, or madness.

Deliver (v. t.) To set free from restraint; to set at liberty; to release; to liberate, as from control; to give up; to free; to save; to rescue from evil actual or feared; -- often with from or out of; as, to deliver one from captivity, or from fear of death.

Deliver (v. t.) To give or transfer; to yield possession or control of; to part with (to); to make over; to commit; to surrender; to resign; -- often with up or over, to or into.

Deliver (v. t.) To free from, or disburden of, young; to relieve of a child in childbirth; to bring forth; -- often with of.

Demicannon (n.) A kind of ordnance, carrying a ball weighing from thirty to thirty-six pounds.

Demisemiquaver (n.) A short note, equal in time to the half of a semiquaver, or the thirty-second part of a whole note.

Denial (n.) The act of gainsaying, refusing, or disowning; negation; -- the contrary of affirmation.

Denial (n.) A refusal to acknowledge; disclaimer of connection with; disavowal; -- the contrary of confession; as, the denial of a fault charged on one; a denial of God.

Derision (n.) An object of derision or scorn; a laughing-stock.

Derive (v. t.) To turn the course of, as water; to divert and distribute into subordinate channels; to diffuse; to communicate; to transmit; -- followed by to, into, on, upon.

Derive (v. t.) To receive, as from a source or origin; to obtain by descent or by transmission; to draw; to deduce; -- followed by from.

Derive (v. t.) To trace the origin, descent, or derivation of; to recognize transmission of; as, he derives this word from the Anglo-Saxon.

Desiccator (n.) A short glass jar fitted with an air-tight cover, and containing some desiccating agent, as sulphuric acid or calcium chloride, above which is suspended the material to be dried, or preserved from moisture.

Design (n.) To intend or purpose; -- usually with for before the remote object, but sometimes with to.

Design (n.) A plan or scheme formed in the mind of something to be done; preliminary conception; idea intended to be expressed in a visible form or carried into action; intention; purpose; -- often used in a bad sense for evil intention or purpose; scheme; plot.

Designate (v. t.) To indicate or set apart for a purpose or duty; -- with to or for; to designate an officer for or to the command of a post or station.

Designedly (adv.) By design; purposely; intentionally; -- opposed to accidentally, ignorantly, or inadvertently.

Designer (n.) A plotter; a schemer; -- used in a bad sense.

Desist (v. i.) To cease to proceed or act; to stop; to forbear; -- often with from.

Devise (v. t.) To give by will; -- used of real estate; formerly, also, of chattels.

Devise (n.) The act of giving or disposing of real estate by will; -- sometimes improperly applied to a bequest of personal estate.

Devisor (n.) One who devises, or gives real estate by will; a testator; -- correlative to devisee.

Digit (n.) One of the ten figures or symbols, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, by which all numbers are expressed; -- so called because of the use of the fingers in counting and computing.

Digit (n.) One twelfth part of the diameter of the sun or moon; -- a term used to express the quantity of an eclipse; as, an eclipse of eight digits is one which hides two thirds of the diameter of the disk.

Digitiform (a.) Formed like a finger or fingers; finger-shaped; as, a digitiform root.

Digitigrade (a.) Walking on the toes; -- distinguished from plantigrade.

Digitigrade (n.) An animal that walks on its toes, as the cat, lion, wolf, etc.; -- distinguished from a plantigrade, which walks on the palm of the foot.

Digitorium (n.) A small dumb keyboard used by pianists for exercising the fingers; -- called also dumb piano.

Diligence (n.) The quality of being diligent; carefulness; careful attention; -- the opposite of negligence.

Diligence (n.) A four-wheeled public stagecoach, used in France.

Diminish (v. t.) To make smaller in any manner; to reduce in bulk or amount; to lessen; -- opposed to augment or increase.

Diminuendo (adv.) In a gradually diminishing manner; with abatement of tone; decrescendo; -- expressed on the staff by Dim., or Dimin., or the sign.

Diminution (n.) The act of diminishing, or of making or becoming less; state of being diminished; reduction in size, quantity, or degree; -- opposed to augmentation or increase.

Dimity (n.) A cotton fabric employed for hangings and furniture coverings, and formerly used for women's under-garments. It is of many patterns, both plain and twilled, and occasionally is printed in colors.

Disimprove (v. t.) To make worse; -- the opposite of improve.

Divide (v. t.) To separate into species; -- said of a genus or generic term.

Divided (a.) Cut into distinct parts, by incisions which reach the midrib; -- said of a leaf.

Dividend (n.) A sum of money to be divided and distributed; the share of a sum divided that falls to each individual; a distribute sum, share, or percentage; -- applied to the profits as appropriated among shareholders, and to assets as apportioned among creditors; as, the dividend of a bank, a railway corporation, or a bankrupt estate.

Dolichocephalous (a.) Having the cranium, or skull, long to its breadth; long-headed; -- opposed to brachycephalic.

Dolioform (a.) Barrel-shaped, or like a cask in form.

Domiculture (n.) The art of house-keeping, cookery, etc.

Domina (n.) Lady; a lady; -- a title formerly given to noble ladies who held a barony in their own right.

Domination (n.) A high order of angels in the celestial hierarchy; -- a meaning given by the schoolmen.

Domine (n.) A West Indian fish (Epinula magistralis), of the family Trichiuridae. It is a long-bodied, voracious fish.

Domineer (v. t.) To rule with insolence or arbitrary sway; to play the master; to be overbearing; to tyrannize; to bluster; to swell with conscious superiority or haughtiness; -- often with over; as, to domineer over dependents.

Domino (n.) A game played by two or more persons, with twenty-eight pieces of wood, bone, or ivory, of a flat, oblong shape, plain at the back, but on the face divided by a Dominus (n.) Master; sir; -- a title of respect formerly applied to a knight or a clergyman, and sometimes to the lord of a manor.

Domite (n.) A grayish variety of trachyte; -- so called from the Puy-de-Dome in Auvergne, France, where it is found.

Dowitcher (n.) The red-breasted or gray snipe (Macrorhamphus griseus); -- called also brownback, and grayback.

Draintile (n.) A hollow tile used in making drains; -- called also draining tile.

Durion (n.) The fruit of the durio. It is oval or globular, and eight or ten inches long. It has a hard prickly rind, containing a soft, cream-colored pulp, of a most delicious flavor and a very offensive odor. The seeds are roasted and eaten like chestnuts.

Earing (n.) A Earing (n.) A Easiness (n.) Freedom from effort, constraint, or formality; -- said of style, manner, etc.

Echidna (n.) A genus of Monotremata found in Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea. They are toothless and covered with spines; -- called also porcupine ant-eater, and Australian ant-eater.

Echinoidea (n. pl.) The class Echinodermata which includes the sea urchins. They have a calcareous, usually more or less spheroidal or disk-shaped, composed of many united plates, and covered with movable spines. See Spatangoid, Clypeastroid.

Echinus (n.) The quarter-round molding (ovolo) of the Roman Doric style. See Illust. of Column

Eclipse (v. t.) To cause the obscuration of; to darken or hide; -- said of a heavenly body; as, the moon eclipses the sun.

Ecliptic (a.) A great circle drawn on a terrestrial globe, making an angle of 23? 28' with the equator; -- used for illustrating and solving astronomical problems.

Effigy (n.) The image, likeness, or representation of a person, whether a full figure, or a part; an imitative figure; -- commonly applied to sculptured likenesses, as those on monuments, or to those of the heads of princes on coins and medals, sometimes applied to portraits.

Egoism (n.) Excessive love and thought of self; the habit of regarding one's self as the center of every interest; selfishness; -- opposed to altruism.

Egoistical (a.) Pertaining to egoism; imbued with egoism or excessive thoughts of self; self-loving.

Ellipsograph (n.) An instrument for describing ellipses; -- called also trammel.

Embiotocoid (n.) One of a family of fishes (Embiotocidae) abundant on the coast of California, remarkable for being viviparous; -- also called surf fishes and viviparous fishes. See Illust. in Append.

Empirical (a.) Depending upon experience or observation alone, without due regard to science and theory; -- said especially of medical practice, remedies, etc.; wanting in science and deep insight; as, empiric skill, remedies.

Empiristic (a.) Relating to, or resulting from, experience, or experiment; following from empirical methods or data; -- opposed to nativistic.

Engine (v. t.) To equip with an engine; -- said especially of steam vessels; as, vessels are often built by one firm and engined by another.

Enrich (v. t.) To make rich with manure; to fertilize; -- said of the soil; as, to enrich land by irrigation.

Enrich (v. t.) To supply with knowledge; to instruct; to store; -- said of the mind.

Ensiform (a.) Having the form of a sword blade; sword-shaped; as, an ensiform leaf.

Ensign (n.) A flag; a banner; a standard; esp., the national flag, or a banner indicating nationality, carried by a ship or a body of soldiers; -- as distinguished from flags indicating divisions of the army, rank of naval officers, or private signals, and the like.

Entire (a.) Not gelded; -- said of a horse.

Entireness (n.) Oneness; unity; -- applied to a condition of intimacy or close association.

Envious (a.) Feeling or exhibiting envy; actuated or directed by, or proceeding from, envy; -- said of a person, disposition, feeling, act, etc.; jealously pained by the excellence or good fortune of another; maliciously grudging; -- followed by of, at, and against; as, an envious man, disposition, attack; envious tongues.

Eosin (n.) A yellow or brownish red dyestuff obtained by the action of bromine on fluorescein, and named from the fine rose-red which it imparts to silk. It is also used for making a fine red ink. Its solution is fluorescent.

Ephippial (a.) Saddle-shaped; occupying an ephippium.

Ephippium (n.) A saddle-shaped cavity to contain the winter eggs, situated on the back of Cladocera.

Equidiurnal (a.) Pertaining to the time of equal day and night; -- applied to the equinoctial Equip (v. t.) To furnish for service, or against a need or exigency; to fit out; to supply with whatever is necessary to efficient action in any way; to provide with arms or an armament, stores, munitions, rigging, etc.; -- said esp. of ships and of troops.

Equipage (n.) A carriage of state or of pleasure with all that accompanies it, as horses, liveried servants, etc., a showy turn-out.

Equipedal (a.) Equal-footed; having the pairs of feet equal.

Equipoise (n.) Equality of weight or force; hence, equilibrium; a state in which the two ends or sides of a thing are balanced, and hence equal; state of being equally balanced; -- said of moral, political, or social interests or forces.

Equisetum (n.) A genus of vascular, cryptogamic, herbaceous plants; -- also called horsetails.

Equitant (a.) Overlapping each other; -- said of leaves whose bases are folded so as to overlap and bestride the leaves within or above them, as in the iris.

Equivalent (a.) Equal in measure but not admitting of superposition; -- applied to magnitudes; as, a square may be equivalent to a triangle.

Erbium (n.) A rare metallic element associated with several other rare elements in the mineral gadolinite from Ytterby in Sweden. Symbol Er. Atomic weight 165.9. Its salts are rose-colored and give characteristic spectra. Its sesquioxide is called erbia.

Ermine (n.) A valuable fur-bearing animal of the genus Mustela (M. erminea), allied to the weasel; the stoat. It is found in the northern parts of Asia, Europe, and America. In summer it is brown, but in winter it becomes white, except the tip of the tail, which is always black.

Erbium (n.) A metallic element of the rare earth group, found in gadolinite and some other minerals. Symbol, Er; at. wt. 167.4. Its salts are rose-colored and give characteristic spectra.

Estimate (v. t.) To judge and form an opinion of the value of, from imperfect data, -- either the extrinsic (money), or intrinsic (moral), value; to fix the worth of roughly or in a general way; as, to estimate the value of goods or land; to estimate the worth or talents of a person.

Ethiops (n.) A black substance; -- formerly applied to various preparations of a black or very dark color.

Eudiometer (n.) An instrument for the volumetric measurement of gases; -- so named because frequently used to determine the purity of the air.

Eupione (n.) A limpid, oily liquid obtained by the destructive distillation of various vegetable and animal substances; -- specifically, an oil consisting largely of the higher hydrocarbons of the paraffin series.

Eupittone (n.) A yellow, crystalExcite (v. t.) To energize (an electro-magnet); to produce a magnetic field in; as, to excite a dynamo.

Expiration (n.) The act or process of breathing out, or forcing air from the lungs through the nose or mouth; as, respiration consists of inspiration and expiration; -- opposed to inspiration.

Expire (v. t.) To breathe out; to emit from the lungs; to throw out from the mouth or nostrils in the process of respiration; -- opposed to inspire.

Expire (v. i.) To come to an end; to cease; to terminate; to perish; to become extinct; as, the flame expired; his lease expires to-day; the month expired on Saturday.

Facility (n.) Easiness to be persuaded; readiness or compliance; -- usually in a bad sense; pliancy.

Facility (n.) That which promotes the ease of any action or course of conduct; advantage; aid; assistance; -- usually in the plural; as, special facilities for study.

Facing (n.) The collar and cuffs of a military coat; -- commonly of a color different from that of the coat.

Facing (n.) The movement of soldiers by turning on their heels to the right, left, or about; -- chiefly in the pl.

Fatiferous (a.) Fate-bringing; deadly; mortal; destructive.

Feminine (a.) Having the qualities of a woman; becoming or appropriate to the female sex; as, in a good sense, modest, graceful, affectionate, confiding; or, in a bad sense, weak, nerveless, timid, pleasure-loving, effeminate.

Filioque (n.) The Latin for, "and from the Son," equivalent to et filio, inserted by the third council of Toledo (a. d. 589) in the clause qui ex Patre procedit (who proceedeth from the Father) of the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed (a. d. 381), which makes a creed state that the Holy Ghost proceeds from the Son as well as from the Father. Hence, the doctrine itself (not admitted by the Eastern Church).

Filibuster (n.) A lawless military adventurer, especially one in quest of plunder; a freebooter; -- originally applied to buccaneers infesting the Spanish American coasts, but introduced into common English to designate the followers of Lopez in his expedition to Cuba in 1851, and those of Walker in his expedition to Nicaragua, in 1855.

Filiety (n.) The relation of a son to a father; sonship; -- the correlative of paternity.

Filipendulous (a.) Suspended by, or strung upon, a thread; -- said of tuberous swellings in the middle or at the extremities of slender, threadlike rootlets.

Finish (n.) Completion; -- opposed to start, or beginning.

Finite (a.) Having a limit; limited in quantity, degree, or capacity; bounded; -- opposed to infinite; as, finite number; finite existence; a finite being; a finite mind; finite duration.

Fluinity (n.) The quality of being fluid or capable of flowing; a liquid, aeriform. or gaseous state; -- opposed to solidity.

Fodientia (n.pl.) A group of African edentates including the aard-vark.

Foliate (v. t.) To spread over with a thin coat of tin and quicksilver; as, to foliate a looking-glass.

Foliation (n.) The act of coating with an amalgam of tin foil and quicksilver, as in making looking-glasses.

Folio (n.) The page number. The even folios are on the left-hand pages and the odd folios on the right-hand.

Folium (n.) A curve of the third order, consisting of two infinite branches, which have a common asymptote. The curve has a double point, and a leaf-shaped loop; whence the name. Its equation is x3 + y3 = axy.

Frail (n.) The quantity of raisins -- about thirty-two, fifty-six, or seventy-five pounds, -- contained in a frail.

Frail (superl) Liable to fall from virtue or be led into sin; not strong against temptation; weak in resolution; also, unchaste; -- often applied to fallen women.

Fruit (v. t.) Whatever is produced for the nourishment or enjoyment of man or animals by the processes of vegetable growth, as corn, grass, cotton, flax, etc.; -- commonly used in the plural.

Fruit (v. t.) That which is produced; the effect or consequence of any action; advantageous or desirable product or result; disadvantageous or evil consequence or effect; as, the fruits of labor, of self-denial, of intemperance.

Fugitive (a.) Not fixed; not durable; liable to disappear or fall away; volatile; uncertain; evanescent; liable to fade; -- applied to material and immaterial things; as, fugitive colors; a fugitive idea.

Fusil (n.) A bearing of a rhomboidal figure; -- named from its shape, which resembles that of a spindle.

Gadic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, the cod (Gadus); -- applied to an acid obtained from cod-liver oil, viz., gadic acid.

Galician (n.) A native of Galicia in Spain; -- called also Gallegan.

Galilean (n.) One of the party among the Jews, who opposed the payment of tribute to the Romans; -- called also Gaulonite.

Galilean (n.) A Christian in general; -- used as a term of reproach by Mohammedans and Pagans.

Galiot (n.) A strong, light-draft, Dutch merchant vessel, carrying a mainmast and a mizzenmast, and a large gaff mainsail.

Gapingstock (n.) One who is an object of open-mouthed wonder.

Garibaldi (n.) A jacket worn by women; -- so called from its resemblance in shape to the red shirt worn by the Italians patriot Garibaldi.

Gavial (n.) A large Asiatic crocodilian (Gavialis Gangeticus); -- called also nako, and Gangetic crocodile.

Genitocrural (a.) Pertaining to the genital organs and the thigh; -- applied especially to one of the lumbar nerves.

Glairin (n.) A glairy viscous substance, which forms on the surface of certain mineral waters, or covers the sides of their inclosures; -- called also baregin.

Glaive (n.) A weapon formerly used, consisting of a large blade fixed on the end of a pole, whose edge was on the outside curve; also, a light lance with a long sharp-pointed head.

Glaive (n.) A sword; -- used poetically and loosely.

Gneissoid (a.) Resembling gneiss; having some of the characteristics of gneiss; -- applied to rocks of an intermediate character between granite and gneiss, or mica slate and gneiss.

Gonimous (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, gonidia or gonimia, as that part of a lichen which contains the green or chlorophyll-bearing cells.

Grail (n.) A broad, open dish; a chalice; -- only used of the Holy Grail.

Graille (n.) A halfround single-cut file or fioat, having one curved face and one straight face, -- used by comb makers.

Grain (n.) The fruit of certain grasses which furnish the chief food of man, as corn, wheat, rye, oats, etc., or the plants themselves; -- used collectively.

Grain (n.) The unit of the English system of weights; -- so called because considered equal to the average of grains taken from the middle of the ears of wheat. 7,000 grains constitute the pound avoirdupois, and 5,760 grains the pound troy. A grain is equal to .0648 gram. See Gram.

Grainer (n.) An infusion of pigeon's dung used by tanners to neutralize the effects of lime and give flexibility to skins; -- called also grains and bate.

Graining (n.) A small European fresh-water fish (Leuciscus vulgaris); - called also dobule, and dace.

Greith (v. t.) To make ready; -- often used reflexively.

Guaiacol (n.) A colorless liquid, C7H8O2, with a peculiar odor. It is the methyl ether of pyrocatechin, and is obtained by distilling guaiacum from wood-tar creosote, and in other ways. It has been used in treating pulmonary tuberculosis.

Guaiacum (n.) The heart wood or the resin of the Guaiacum offinale or lignum-vitae, a large tree of the West Indies and Central America. It is much used in medicine.

Habitant (v. t.) An inhabitant or resident; -- a name applied to and denoting farmers of French descent or origin in Canada, especially in the Province of Quebec; -- usually in plural.

Hacienda (n.) A large estate where work of any kind is done, as agriculture, manufacturing, mining, or raising of animals; a cultivated farm, with a good house, in distinction from a farming establishment with rude huts for herdsmen, etc.; -- a word used in Spanish-American regions.

Hagioscope (n.) An opening made in the interior walls of a cruciform church to afford a view of the altar to those in the transepts; -- called, in architecture, a squint.

Halichondriae (n. pl.) An order of sponges, having simple siliceous spicules and keratose fibers; -- called also Keratosilicoidea.

Halidom (n.) HoHaliotis (n.) A genus of marine shells; the ear-shells. See Abalone.

Haliotoid (a.) Like or pertaining to the genus Haliotis; ear-shaped.

Hamiform (n.) Hook-shaped.

Hamilton period () A subdivision of the Devonian system of America; -- so named from Hamilton, Madison Co., New York. It includes the Marcellus, Hamilton, and Genesee epochs or groups. See the Chart of Geology.

Hamite (n.) A descendant of Ham, Noah's second son. See Gen. x. 6-20.

Harikari (n.) See Hara-kiri.

Heliography (n.) An early photographic process invented by Nicephore Niepce, and still used in photo-engraving. It consists essentially in exposing under a design or in a camera a polished metal plate coated with a preparation of asphalt, and subsequently treating the plate with a suitable solvent. The light renders insoluble those parts of the film which is strikes, and so a permanent image is formed, which can be etched upon the plate by the use of acid.

Helianthin (n.) An artificial, orange dyestuff, analogous to tropaolin, and like it used as an indicator in alkalimetry; -- called also methyl orange.

Helicine (a.) Curled; spiral; helicoid; -- applied esp. to certain arteries of the penis.

Heliocentrical (a.) pertaining to the sun's center, or appearing to be seen from it; having, or relating to, the sun as a center; -- opposed to geocentrical.

Heliolite (n.) A fossil coral of the genus Heliolites, having twelve-rayed cells. It is found in the Silurian rocks.

Heliopora (n.) An East Indian stony coral now known to belong to the Alcyonaria; -- called also blue coral.

Heliotrope (n.) A plant of the genus Heliotropium; -- called also turnsole and girasole. H. Peruvianum is the commonly cultivated species with fragrant flowers.

Heliozoa (n. pl.) An order of fresh-water rhizopods having a more or less globular form, with slender radiating pseudopodia; the sun animalcule.

Hemimellitic (a.) Having half as many (three) carboxyl radicals as mellitic acid; -- said of an organic acid.

Hemimorphic (a.) Having the two ends modified with unlike planes; -- said of a crystal.

Hemin (n.) A substance, in the form of reddish brown, microscopic, prismatic crystals, formed from dried blood by the action of strong acetic acid and common salt; -- called also Teichmann's crystals. Chemically, it is a hydrochloride of hematin.

Hemitropous (a.) Having the raphe terminating about half way between the chalaza and the orifice; amphitropous; -- said of an ovule.

Herisson (n.) A beam or bar armed with iron spikes, and turning on a pivot; -- used to block up a passage.

Hexine (n.) A hydrocarbon, C6H10, of the acetylene series, obtained artificially as a colorless, volatile, pungent liquid; -- called also hexoylene.

Homing (p.a.) Home-returning.

Homing (a.) Home-returning; -- used specifically of carrier pigeons.

Humidity (n.) Moisture; dampness; a moderate degree of wetness, which is perceptible to the eye or touch; -- used especially of the atmosphere, or of anything which has absorbed moisture from the atmosphere, as clothing.

Humility (n.) The state or quality of being humble; freedom from pride and arrogance; lowHumin (n.) A bitter, brownish yellow, amorphous substance, extracted from vegetable mold, and also produced by the action of acids on certain sugars and carbohydrates; -- called also humic acid, ulmin, gein, ulmic or geic acid, etc.

Hypidiomorphic (a.) Partly idiomorphic; -- said of rock a portion only of whose constituents have a distinct crystalIgnite (v. t.) To subject to the action of intense heat; to heat strongly; -- often said of incombustible or infusible substances; as, to ignite iron or platinum.

Illiberal (a.) Indicating a lack of breeding, culture, and the like; ignoble; rude; narrow-minded; disingenuous.

Illicium (n.) A genus of Asiatic and American magnoliaceous trees, having star-shaped fruit; star anise. The fruit of Illicium anisatum is used as a spice in India, and its oil is largely used in Europe for flavoring cordials, being almost identical with true oil of anise.

Illuminati (v. t.) Members of a sect which sprung up in Spain about the year 1575. Their principal doctrine was, that, by means of prayer, they had attained to so perfect a state as to have no need of o Imbibition (n.) The act or process of imbibing, or absorbing; as, the post-mortem imbibition of poisons.

Immigrant (n.) One who immigrates; one who comes to a country for the purpose of permanent residence; -- correlative of emigrant.

Imminent (a.) Threatening to occur immediately; near at hand; impending; -- said especially of misfortune or peril.

Immission (n.) The act of immitting, or of sending or thrusting in; injection; -- the correlative of emission.

Immit (v. t.) To send in; to inject; to infuse; -- the correlative of emit.

Impinge (v. t.) To fall or dash against; to touch upon; to strike; to hit; to ciash with; -- with on or upon.

Indian (n.) One of the aboriginal inhabitants of America; -- so called originally from the supposed identity of America with India.

Indican (n.) An indigo-forming substance, found in urine, and other animal fluids, and convertible into red and blue indigo (urrhodin and uroglaucin). Chemically, it is indoxyl sulphate of potash, C8H6NSO4K, and is derived from the indol formed in the alimentary canal. Called also uroxanthin.

Indicavit (n.) A writ of prohibition against proceeding in the spiritual court in certain cases, when the suit belongs to the common-law courts.

Indicolite (n.) A variety of tourmaIndigent (a.) Wanting; void; free; destitute; -- used with of.

Indigested (a.) Not in a state suitable for healing; -- said of wounds.

Indigested (a.) Not ripened or suppurated; -- said of an abscess or its contents.

Indigo (n.) A blue dyestuff obtained from several plants belonging to very different genera and orders; as, the woad, Isatis tinctoria, Indigofera tinctoria, I. Anil, Nereum tinctorium, etc. It is a dark blue earthy substance, tasteless and odorless, with a copper-violet luster when rubbed. Indigo does not exist in the plants as such, but is obtained by decomposition of the glycoside indican.

Individualism (n.) An excessive or exclusive regard to one's personal interest; self-interest; selfishness.

Infidel (a.) Not holding the faith; -- applied esp. to one who does not believe in the inspiration of the Scriptures, and the supernatural origin of Christianity.

Infield (n.) Arable and manured land kept continually under crop; -- distinguished from outfield.

Infield (n.) The diamond; -- opposed to outfield. See Diamond, n., 5.

Infiltrate (v. t.) To penetrate gradually; -- sometimes used reflexively.

Infinite (a.) Without limit in power, capacity, knowledge, or excellence; boundless; immeasurably or inconceivably great; perfect; as, the infinite wisdom and goodness of God; -- opposed to finite.

Infinite (a.) Greater than any assignable quantity of the same kind; -- said of certain quantities.

Infinite (a.) Capable of endless repetition; -- said of certain forms of the canon, called also perpetual fugues, so constructed that their ends lead to their beginnings, and the performance may be incessantly repeated.

Infirmary (n.) A hospital, or place where the infirm or sick are lodged and nursed gratuitously, or where out-patients are treated.

Inning (n.) The state or turn of being in; specifically, in cricket, baseball, etc.,the turn or time of a player or of a side at the bat; -- often in the pl. Hence: The turn or time of a person, or a party, in power; as, the Whigs went out, and the Democrats had their innings.

Insidious (a.) Lying in wait; watching an opportunity to insnare or entrap; deceitful; sly; treacherous; -- said of persons; as, the insidious foe.

Insight (n.) A sight or view of the interior of anything; a deep inspection or view; introspection; -- frequently used with into.

Insincere (a.) Not being in truth what one appears to be; not sincere; dissembling; hypocritical; disingenuous; deceitful; false; -- said of persons; also of speech, thought; etc.; as, insincere declarations.

Insinuate (v. t.) To hint; to suggest by remote allusion; -- often used derogatorily; as, did you mean to insinuate anything?

Insinuate (v. t.) To push or work (one's self), as into favor; to introduce by slow, gentle, or artful means; to ingratiate; -- used reflexively.

Insinuation (n.) The act of gaining favor, affection, or influence, by gentle or artful means; -- formerly used in a good sense, as of friendly influence or interposition.

Insist (v. i.) To stand or rest; to find support; -- with in, on, or upon.

Insist (v. i.) To take a stand and refuse to give way; to hold to something firmly or determinedly; to be persistent, urgent, or pressing; to persist in demanding; -- followed by on, upon, or that; as, he insisted on these conditions; he insisted on going at once; he insists that he must have money.

Intimate (a.) Innermost; inward; internal; deep-seated; hearty.

Inviscerate (a.) Deep-seated; internal.

Invisible (n.) A Rosicrucian; -- so called because avoiding declaration of his craft.

Ionic (n.) A foot consisting of four syllables: either two long and two short, -- that is, a spondee and a pyrrhic, in which case it is called the greater Ionic; or two short and two long, -- that is, a pyrrhic and a spondee, in which case it is called the smaller Ionic.

Irritability (n.) A natural susceptibility, characteristic of all living organisms, tissues, and cells, to the influence of certain stimuli, response being manifested in a variety of ways, -- as that quality in plants by which they exhibit motion under suitable stimulation; esp., the property which living muscle processes, of responding either to a direct stimulus of its substance, or to the stimulating influence of its nerve fibers, the response being indicated by a change of form, or contrac> Irritation (n.) The act of exciting, or the condition of being excited to action, by stimulation; -- as, the condition of an organ of sense, when its nerve is affected by some external body; esp., the act of exciting muscle fibers to contraction, by artificial stimulation; as, the irritation of a motor nerve by electricity; also, the condition of a muscle and nerve, under such stimulation.

Itzibu (n.) A silver coin of Japan, worth about thirty-four cents.

Jadish (a.) Vicious; ill-tempered; resembling a jade; -- applied to a horse.

Jadish (a.) Unchaste; -- applied to a woman.

Janitor (n.) A door-keeper; a porter; one who has the care of a public building, or a building occupied for offices, suites of rooms, etc.

jubilee () One celebrated upon the completion of sixty, or, according to some, seventy-five, years from the beginning of the thing commemorated.

Jovial (a.) Gay; merry; joyous; jolly; mirth-inspiring; hilarious; characterized by mirth or jollity; as, a jovial youth; a jovial company; a jovial poem.

Jubilate (n.) The third Sunday after Easter; -- so called because the introit is the 66th Psalm, which, in the Latin version, begins with the words, "Jubilate Deo."

Jubilate (n.) A name of the 100th Psalm; -- so called from its opening word in the Latin version.

Jubilee (n.) A church solemnity or ceremony celebrated at Rome, at stated intervals, originally of one hundred years, but latterly of twenty-five; a plenary and extraordinary indulgence grated by the sovereign pontiff to the universal church. One invariable condition of granting this indulgence is the confession of sins and receiving of the eucharist.

Kali (n.) The last and worst of the four ages of the world; -- considered to have begun B. C. 3102, and to last 432,000 years.

Kali (n.) The black, destroying goddess; -- called also Doorga, Anna Purna.

Kalium (n.) Potassium; -- so called by the German chemists.

Kepi (n.) A military cap having a close-fitting band, a round flat top sloping toward the front, and a visor. As originally worn by the French in Algeria about 1830 it was tall and stiff with a straight visor. It is now lower, has a curved visor, and is frequently soft.

Kinit (n.) A unit of force equal to the force which, acting for one second, will give a pound a velocity of one foot per second; -- proposed by J.D.Everett, an English physicist.

Kerite (n.) A compound in which tar or asphaltum combined with animal or vegetable oils is vulcanized by sulphur, the product closely resembling rubber; -- used principally as an insulating material in telegraphy.

Kiwikiwi (n.) Any species of Apteryx, esp. A. australis; -- so called in imitation of its notes. Called also kiwi. See Apteryx.

Labiose (a.) Having the appearance of being labiate; -- said of certain polypetalous corollas.

Ladino (n.) One of the half-breed descendants of whites and Indians; a mestizo; -- so called throughout Central America. They are usually of a yellowish orange tinge.

Lamina (n.) A thin plate or scale; a layer or coat lying over another; -- said of thin plates or platelike substances, as of bone or minerals.

Laminarite (n.) A broad-leafed fossil alga.

Lariat (n.) A long, slender rope made of hemp or strips of hide, esp. one with a noose; -- used as a lasso for catching cattle, horses, etc., and for picketing a horse so that he can graze without wandering.

Laticiferous (a.) Containing the latex; -- applied to the tissue or tubular vessels in which the latex of the plant is found.

Laticostate (a.) Broad-ribbed.

Latidentate (a.) Broad-toothed.

Latirostres (n. pl.) The broad-billed singing birds, such as the swallows, and their allies.

Latisternal (a.) Having a broad breastbone, or sternum; -- said of anthropoid apes.

Laying (n.) The first coat on laths of plasterer's two-coat work.

Legible (a.) Capable of being read or deciphered; distinct to the eye; plain; -- used of writing or printing; as, a fair, legible manuscript.

Legion (n.) A body of foot soldiers and cavalry consisting of different numbers at different periods, -- from about four thousand to about six thousand men, -- the cavalry being about one tenth.

Legislative (a.) Making, or having the power to make, a law or laws; lawmaking; -- distinguished from executive; as, a legislative act; a legislative body.

Lenient (a.) Relaxing; emollient; softening; assuasive; -- sometimes followed by of.

Lenity (n.) The state or quality of being lenient; mildness of temper or disposition; gentleness of treatment; softness; tenderness; clemency; -- opposed to severity and rigor.

Lepidolite (n.) A species of mica, of a lilac or rose-violet color, containing lithia. It usually occurs in masses consisting of small scales. See Mica.

Lepidomelane (n.) An iron-potash mica, of a raven-black color, usually found in granitic rocks in small six-sided tables, or as an aggregation of minute opaque scales. See Mica.

Lepidosiren (n.) An eel-shaped ganoid fish of the order Dipnoi, having both gills and lungs. It inhabits the rivers of South America. The name is also applied to a related African species (Protopterus annectens). The lepidosirens grow to a length of from four to six feet. Called also doko.

Levir (n.) A husband's brother; -- used in reference to levirate marriages.

Levitate (v. i.) To rise, or tend to rise, as if lighter than the surrounding medium; to become buoyant; -- opposed to gravitate.

Levite (n.) A priest; -- so called in contempt or ridicule.

Levity (n.) The quality of weighing less than something else of equal bulk; relative lightness, especially as shown by rising through, or floating upon, a contiguous substance; buoyancy; -- opposed to gravity.

Lewisson (n.) An iron dovetailed tenon, made in sections, which can be fitted into a dovetail mortise; -- used in hoisting large stones, etc.

Liking (n.) The state of being pleased with, or attracted toward, some thing or person; hence, inclination; desire; pleasure; preference; -- often with for, formerly with to; as, it is an amusement I have no liking for.

Liliaceous (a.) Of or pertaining to a natural order of which the lily, tulip, and hyacinth are well-known examples.

LimicoLiriodendron (n.) A genus of large and very beautiful trees of North America, having smooth, shining leaves, and handsome, tuliplike flowers; tulip tree; whitewood; -- called also canoewood. Liriodendron tulipifera is the only extant species, but there were several others in the Cretaceous epoch.

Liripoop (n.) A pendent part of the old clerical tippet; afterwards, a tippet; a scarf; -- worn also by doctors, learned men, etc.

Laving (v. i.) Active; lively; vigorous; -- said esp. of states of the mind, and sometimes of abstract things; as, a living faith; a living principle.

Laving (v. i.) Issuing continually from the earth; running; flowing; as, a living spring; -- opposed to stagnant.

Lorikeet (n.) Any one numerous species of small brush-tongued parrots or lories, found mostly in Australia, New Guinea and the adjacent islands, with some forms in the East Indies. They are arboreal in their habits and feed largely upon the honey of flowers. They belong to Trichoglossus, Loriculus, and several allied genera.

Lucifer (n.) The planet Venus, when appearing as the morning star; -- applied in Isaiah by a metaphor to a king of Babylon.

Lucifer (n.) A match made of a sliver of wood tipped with a combustible substance, and ignited by friction; -- called also lucifer match, and locofoco. See Locofoco.

Lucifer (n.) A genus of free-swimming macruran Crustacea, having a slender body and long appendages.

Lycine (n.) A weak base identical with betaine; -- so called because found in the boxthorn (Lycium barbarum). See Betaine.

Lydian (a.) Of or pertaining to Lydia, a country of Asia Minor, or to its inhabitants; hence, soft; effeminate; -- said especially of one of the ancient Greek modes or keys, the music in which was of a soft, pathetic, or voluptuous character.

Lyrical (a.) Fitted to be sung to the lyre; hence, also, appropriate for song; -- said especially of poetry which expresses the individual emotions of the poet.

Lyric (n.) A verse of the kind usually employed in lyric poetry; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Lyrid (n.) One of the group of shooting stars which come into the air in certain years on or about the 19th of April; -- so called because the apparent path among the stars the stars if produced back wards crosses the constellation Lyra.

Lyrie (n.) A European fish (Peristethus cataphractum), having the body covered with bony plates, and having three spines projecting in front of the nose; -- called also noble, pluck, pogge, sea poacher, and armed bullhead.

Lyriferous (a.) Having a lyre-shaped shoulder girdle, as certain fishes.

Marinism (n.) A bombastic literary style marked by the use of metaphors and antitheses characteristic of the Italian poet Giambattista Marini (1569-1625).

Magister (n.) Master; sir; -- a title of the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority, or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts.

Magistery (n.) A precipitate; a fine substance deposited by precipitation; -- applied in old chemistry to certain white precipitates from metallic solutions; as, magistery of bismuth.

Magistral (a.) Formulated extemporaneously, or for a special case; -- opposed to officinal, and said of prescriptions and medicines.

Malignant (n.) One of the adherents of Charles L. or Charles LL.; -- so called by the opposite party.

Manichordon () The clavichord or clarichord; -- called also dumb spinet.

Manifest (a.) Detected; convicted; -- with of.

Manifest (v. t.) To show plainly; to make to appear distinctly, -- usually to the mind; to put beyond question or doubt; to display; to exhibit.

Manifold (a.) Exhibited at divers times or in various ways; -- used to qualify nouns in the singular number.

Manikin (n.) A model of the human body, made of papier-mache or other material, commonly in detachable pieces, for exhibiting the different parts and organs, their relative position, etc.

Maxilloturbinal (n.) The maxillo-turbinal, or inferior turbinate, bone.

Maximum (n.) The greatest quantity or value attainable in a given case; or, the greatest value attained by a quantity which first increases and then begins to decrease; the highest point or degree; -- opposed to minimum.

Medialuna (n.) See Half-moon.

Median (a.) Situated in the middle; lying in a plane dividing a bilateral animal into right and left halves; -- said of unpaired organs and parts; as, median coverts.

Mediant (n.) The third above the keynote; -- so called because it divides the interval between the tonic and dominant into two thirds.

Mediately (adv.) In a mediate manner; by a secondary cause or agent; not directly or primarily; by means; -- opposed to immediately.

Mediatize (v. t.) To cause to act through an agent or to hold a subordinate position; to annex; -- specifically applied to the annexation during the former German empire of a smaller German state to a larger, while allowing it a nominal sovereignty, and its prince his rank.

Meditation (n.) Thought; -- without regard to kind.

Melicerous (a.) Consisting of or containing matter like honey; -- said of certain encysted tumors.

Meliphagan (n.) Any bird of the genus Meliphaga and allied genera; a honey eater; -- called also meliphagidan.

Melisma (n.) A piece of melody; a song or tune, -- as opposed to recitative or musical declamation.

Melitose (n.) A variety of sugar isomeric with sucrose, extracted from cotton seeds and from the so-called Australian manna (a secretion of certain species of Eucalyptus).

Meniscoid (a.) Concavo-convex, like a meniscus.

Menispermine (n.) An alkaloid distinct from picrotoxin and obtained from the cocculus indicus (the fruit of Anamirta Cocculus, formerly Menispermum Cocculus) as a white, crystalMesial (a.) Middle; median; in, or in the region of, the mesial plane; internal; -- opposed to lateral.

Militate (v. i.) To make war; to fight; to contend; -- usually followed by against and with.

Mimical (a.) Imitative; characterized by resemblance to other forms; -- applied to crystals which by twinning resemble simple forms of a higher grade of symmetry.

Mimicry (n.) Protective resemblance; the resemblance which certain animals and plants exhibit to other animals and plants or to the natural objects among which they live, -- a characteristic which serves as their chief means of protection against enemies; imitation; mimesis; mimetism.

Minimum (n.) The least quantity assignable, admissible, or possible, in a given case; hence, a thing of small consequence; -- opposed to maximum.

Minion (n.) A loved one; one highly esteemed and favored; -- in a good sense.

Minionette (n.) A size of type between nonpareil and minion; -- used in ornamental borders, etc.

Mitigate (v. t.) To make mild and accessible; to mollify; -- applied to persons.

Miting (n.) A little one; -- used as a term of endearment.

Mobile (a.) Characterized by an extreme degree of fluidity; moving or flowing with great freedom; as, benzine and mercury are mobile liquids; -- opposed to viscous, viscoidal, or oily.

Modillion (n.) The enriched block or horizontal bracket generally found under the cornice of the Corinthian and Composite entablature, and sometimes, less ornamented, in the Ionic and other orders; -- so called because of its arrangement at regulated distances.

Mohicans (n. pl.) A tribe of Lenni-Lenape Indians who formerly inhabited Western Connecticut and Eastern New York.

Monism (n.) That doctrine which refers all phenomena to a single ultimate constituent or agent; -- the opposite of dualism.

Monitor (n.) An ironclad war vessel, very low in the water, and having one or more heavily-armored revolving turrets, carrying heavy guns.

Morin (n.) A yellow crystalMoringa (n.) A genus of trees of Southern India and Northern Africa. One species (Moringa pterygosperma) is the horse-radish tree, and its seeds, as well as those of M. aptera, are known in commerce as ben or ben nuts, and yield the oil called oil of ben.

Morintannic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a variety of tannic acid extracted from fustic (Maclura, formerly Morus, tinctoria) as a yellow crystalMotile (a.) Having powers of self-motion, though unconscious; as, the motile spores of certain seaweeds.

Motion (n.) The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; -- opposed to rest.

Moxie (n.) Know-how, expertise.

Modiste (n.) One, esp. woman, who makes, or deals in, articles of fashion, esp. of the fashionable dress of ladies; a dress-maker or milMonism (n.) The doctrine that the universe is an organized unitary being or total self-inclusive structure.

Movie (n.) A moving picture or a moving picture show; -- commonly used in pl.

Muride (n.) Bromine; -- formerly so called from its being obtained from sea water.

Myricin (n.) A silky, crystalMyricyl (n.) A hypothetical radical regarded as the essential residue of myricin; -- called also melissyl.

Myristin (n.) The myristate of glycerin, -- found as a vegetable fat in nutmeg butter, etc.

Mykiss (n.) A salmon (Salmo mykiss, syn. S. purpuratus) marked with black spots and a red throat, found in most of the rivers from Alaska to the Colorado River, and in Siberia; -- called also black-spotted trout, cutthroat trout, and redthroat trout.

Nanism (n.) The condition of being abnormally small in stature; dwarfishness; -- opposed to gigantism.

Napiform (a.) Turnip-shaped; large and round in the upper part, and very slender below.

Nation (n.) A great number; a great deal; -- by way of emphasis; as, a nation of herbs.

Native (a.) Of or pertaining to one's birth; natal; belonging to the place or the circumstances in which one is born; -- opposed to foreign; as, native land, language, color, etc.

Neoimpressionism (n.) A theory or practice which is a further development, on more rigorously scientific Niding (n.) A coward; a dastard; -- a term of utmost opprobrium.

Nitid (a.) Gay; spruce; fine; -- said of persons.

Nolition (n.) Adverse action of will; unwillingness; -- opposed to volition.

Nomic (a.) Customary; ordinary; -- applied to the usual English spelling, in distinction from strictly phonetic methods.

Nominative (a.) Giving a name; naming; designating; -- said of that case or form of a noun which stands as the subject of a finite verb.

Nonillion (n.) According to the French and American notation, a thousand octillions, or a unit with thirty ciphers annexed; according to the English notation, a million octillions, or a unit with fifty-four ciphers annexed. See the Note under Numeration.

Nuciform (a.) Shaped like a nut; nut-shaped.

Nudity (n.) That which is nude or naked; naked part; undraped or unclothed portion; esp. (Fine Arts), the human figure represented unclothed; any representation of nakedness; -- chiefly used in the plural and in a bad sense.

Obdiplostemonous (a.) Having twice as many stamens as petals, those of the outer set being opposite the petals; -- said of flowers.

Obligatory (a.) Binding in law or conscience; imposing duty or obligation; requiring performance or forbearance of some act; -- often followed by on or upon; as, obedience is obligatory on a soldier.

Oblique (v. i.) To march in a direction oblique to the Obliterate (a.) Scarcely distinct; -- applied to the markings of insects.

Occident (n.) The part of the horizon where the sun last appears in the evening; that part of the earth towards the sunset; the west; -- opposed to orient. Specifically, in former times, Europe as opposed to Asia; now, also, the Western hemisphere.

Occidental (a.) Of, pertaining to, or situated in, the occident, or west; western; -- opposed to oriental; as, occidental climates, or customs; an occidental planet.

Occidental (a.) Possessing inferior hardness, brilliancy, or beauty; -- used of inferior precious stones and gems, because those found in the Orient are generally superior.

Octillion (n.) According to the French method of numeration (which method is followed also in the United States) the number expressed by a unit with twenty-seven ciphers annexed. According to the English method, the number expressed by a unit with forty-eight ciphers annexed. See Numeration.

Office (n.) That which is performed, intended, or assigned to be done, by a particular thing, or that which anything is fitted to perform; a function; -- answering to duty in intelligent beings.

Officialism (n.) The state of being official; a system of official government; also, adherence to office routine; red-tapism.

Officinal (a.) Kept in stock by apothecaries; -- said of such drugs and medicines as may be obtained without special preparation or compounding; not magistral.

Olein (n.) A fat, liquid at ordinary temperatures, but solidifying at temperatures below 0? C., found abundantly in both the animal and vegetable kingdoms (see Palmitin). It dissolves solid fats, especially at 30-40? C. Chemically, olein is a glyceride of oleic acid; and, as three molecules of the acid are united to one molecule of glyceryl to form the fat, it is technically known as triolein. It is also called elain.

Omnibus (n.) A sheet-iron cover for articles in a leer or annealing arch, to protect them from drafts.

Omniety (n.) That which is all-pervading or all-comprehensive; hence, the Deity.

Omniferous (a.) All-bearing; producing all kinds.

Omnific (a.) All-creating.

Omniparient (a.) Producing or bringing forth all things; all-producing.

Omnipotent (a.) Able in every respect and for every work; unlimited in ability; all-powerful; almighty; as, the Being that can create worlds must be omnipotent.

Omniscience (n.) The quality or state of being omniscient; -- an attribute peculiar to God.

Omniscious (a.) All-knowing.

Omnispective (a.) Beholding everything; capable of seeing all things; all-seeing.

Omnivorous (a.) All-devouring; eating everything indiscriminately; as, omnivorous vanity; esp. (Zool.), eating both animal and vegetable food.

Ophicleide (n.) A large brass wind instrument, formerly used in the orchestra and in military bands, having a loud tone, deep pitch, and a compass of three octaves; -- now generally supplanted by bass and contrabass tubas.

Ophiophagous (a.) Feeding on serpents; -- said of certain birds and reptiles.

Ophite (n.) A greenish spotted porphyry, being a diabase whose pyroxene has been altered to uralite; -- first found in the Pyreness. So called from the colored spots which give it a mottled appearance.

Ophite (a.) A mamber of a Gnostic serpent-worshiping sect of the second century.

Ophiuchus (n.) A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere, deOphiuroidea (n. pl.) A class of star-shaped echinoderms having a disklike body, with slender, articulated arms, which are not grooved beneath and are often very fragile; -- called also Ophiuroida and Ophiuridea. See Illust. under Brittle star.

Optimism (n.) A disposition to take the most hopeful view; -- opposed to pessimism.

Optimist (n.) One who looks on the bright side of things, or takes hopeful views; -- opposed to pessimist.

Option (n.) A right formerly belonging to an archbishop to select any one dignity or benefice in the gift of a suffragan bishop consecrated or confirmed by him, for bestowal by himself when next vacant; -- annulled by Parliament in 1845.

Ordinate (a.) Well-ordered; orderly; regular; methodical.

Ornithosauria (n. pl.) An order of extinct flying reptiles; -- called also Pterosauria.

Orpiment (n.) Arsenic sesquisulphide, produced artificially as an amorphous lemonyellow powder, and occurring naturally as a yellow crystalOrpine (n.) A low plant with fleshy leaves (Sedum telephium), having clusters of purple flowers. It is found on dry, sandy places, and on old walls, in England, and has become naturalized in America. Called also stonecrop, and live-forever.

Orris (n.) A plant of the genus Iris (I. Florentina); a kind of flower-de-luce. Its rootstock has an odor resembling that of violets.

Oscillaria (n.) A genus of dark green, or purplish black, filamentous, fresh-water algae, the threads of which have an automatic swaying or crawling motion. Called also Oscillatoria.

Osmiamic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, a nitrogenous acid of osmium, H2N2Os2O5, forming a well-known series of yellow salts.

Ossified (a.) Changed to bone or something resembling bone; hardened by deposits of mineral matter of any kind; -- said of tissues.

Ossifragous (a.) Serving to break bones; bone-breaking.

Ovoidal (a.) Resembling an egg in shape; egg-shaped; ovate; as, an ovoidal apple.

Padishah (n.) Chief ruler; monarch; sovereign; -- a title of the Sultan of Turkey, and of the Shah of Persia.

Pacifico (n.) A peaceful person; -- applied specif. by the Spaniards to the natives in Cuba and the Philippine Islands who did not oppose the Spanish arms.

Palisade (n.) A Palingenesy (n.) A new birth; a re-creation; a regeneration; a continued existence in different manner or form.

Palingenesy (n.) That form of evolution in which the truly ancestral characters conserved by heredity are reproduced in development; original simple descent; -- distinguished from kenogenesis. Sometimes, in zoology, the abrupt metamorphosis of insects, crustaceans, etc.

Panic (a.) Extreme or sudden and causeless; unreasonable; -- said of fear or fright; as, panic fear, terror, alarm.

Papism (n.) Popery; -- an offensive term.

Papist (n.) A Roman catholic; one who adheres to the Church of Rome and the authority of the pope; -- an offensive designation applied to Roman Catholics by their opponents.

Papistical (a.) Of or pertaining to the Church of Rome and its doctrines and ceremonies; pertaining to popery; popish; -- used disparagingly.

Parietal (a.) Attached to the main wall of the ovary, and not to the axis; -- said of a placenta.

Parillin (n.) A glucoside resembling saponin, found in the root of sarsaparilla, smilax, etc., and extracted as a bitter white crystalPatient (a.) Forbearing; long-suffering.

Patient (n.) A person under medical or surgical treatment; -- correlative to physician or nurse.

Paviin (n.) A glucoside found in species of the genus Pavia of the Horse-chestnut family.

Penicillate (a.) Having the form of a pencil; furnished with a pencil of fine hairs; ending in a tuft of hairs like a camel's-hair brush, as the stigmas of some grasses.

Penitential (n.) A book formerly used by priests hearing confessions, containing rules for the imposition of penances; -- called also penitential book.

Pericambium (n.) A layer of thin-walled young cells in a growing stem, in which layer certain new vessels originate.

Perichaetous (a.) Surrounded by setae; -- said of certain earthworms (genus Perichaetus).

Perigastric (a.) Surrounding the stomach; -- applied to the body cavity of Bryozoa and various other Invertebrata.

Perigeum (n.) That point in the orbit of the moon which is nearest to the earth; -- opposed to apogee. It is sometimes, but rarely, used of the nearest points of other orbits, as of a comet, a planet, etc. Called also epigee, epigeum.

Perigynium (n.) Some unusual appendage about the pistil, as the bottle-shaped body in the sedges, and the bristles or scales in some other genera of the Sedge family, or Cyperaceae.

Perigynous (a.) Having the ovary free, but the petals and stamens borne on the calyx; -- said of flower such as that of the cherry or peach.

Perihelium (n.) That point of the orbit of a planet or comet which is nearest to the sun; -- opposed to aphelion.

Period (n.) A complete sentence, from one full stop to another; esp., a well-proportioned, harmonious sentence.

Periostracum (n.) A chitinous membrane covering the exterior of many shells; -- called also epidermis.

Peripteral (a.) Having columns on all sides; -- said of an edifice. See Apteral.

Perissad (a.) Odd; not even; -- said of elementary substances and of radicals whose valence is not divisible by two without a remainder. Contrasted with artiad.

Perissodactyla (n. pl.) A division of ungulate mammals, including those that have an odd number of toes, as the horse, tapir, and rhinoceros; -- opposed to Artiodactyla.

Peristeropodous (a.) Having pigeonlike feet; -- said of those gallinaceous birds that rest on all four toes, as the curassows and megapods.

Petit (a.) Small; little; insignificant; mean; -- Same as Petty.

Petition (n.) A formal written request addressed to an official person, or to an organized body, having power to grant it; specifically (Law), a supplication to government, in either of its branches, for the granting of a particular grace or right; -- in distinction from a memorial, which calls certain facts to mind; also, the written document.

Pewit (n.) The European black-headed, or laughing, gull (Xema ridibundus). See under Laughing.

Perique (n.) A kind of tobacco with medium-sized leaf, small stem, tough and gummy fiber, raised in Louisiana, and cured in its own juices, so as to be very dark colored, usually black. It is marketed in tightly wrapped rolls called carottes.

Phainopepla (n.) A small crested passerine bird (Phainopepla nitens), native of Mexico and the Southern United States. The adult male is of a uniform glossy blue-black; the female is brownish. Called also black flycatcher.

Pilidium (n.) The free-swimming, hat-shaped larva of certain nemertean worms. It has no resemblance to its parent, and the young worm develops in its interior.

Pinic (a.) Of or pertaining to the pine; obtained from the pine; formerly, designating an acid which is the chief constituent of common resin, -- now called abietic, or sylvic, acid.

Piping (v.) Simmering; boiling; sizzling; hissing; -- from the sound of boiling fluids.

Piping (n.) A small cord covered with cloth, -- used as trimming for women's dresses.

Pipistrelle (n.) A small European bat (Vesperugo pipistrellus); -- called also flittermouse.

Pitiless (a.) Destitute of pity; hard-hearted; merciless; as, a pitilessmaster; pitiless elements.

Plaintiff (n.) One who commences a personal action or suit to obtain a remedy for an injury to his rights; -- opposed to defendant.

Pleiophyllous (a.) Having several leaves; -- used especially when several leaves or leaflets appear where normally there should be only one.

Podical (a.) Anal; -- applied to certain organs of insects.

Politic (a.) Pertaining to, or promoting, a policy, especially a national policy; well-devised; adapted to its end, whether right or wrong; -- said of things; as, a politic treaty.

Politic (a.) Sagacious in promoting a policy; ingenious in devising and advancing a system of management; devoted to a scheme or system rather than to a principle; hence, in a good sense, wise; prudent; sagacious; and in a bad sense, artful; unscrupulous; cunning; -- said of persons.

Politician (n.) One primarily devoted to his own advancement in public office, or to the success of a political party; -- used in a depreciatory sense; one addicted or attached to politics as managed by parties (see Politics, 2); a schemer; an intriguer; as, a mere politician.

Politzerization (n.) The act of inflating the middle ear by blowing air up the nose during the act of swallowing; -- so called from Prof. Politzer of Vienna, who first practiced it.

Poniard (n.) A kind of dagger, -- usually a slender one with a triangular or square blade.

Popish (a.) Of or pertaining to the pope; taught or ordained by the pope; hence, of or pertaining to the Roman Catholic Church; -- often used opprobriously.

Porifera (n. pl.) A grand division of the Invertebrata, including the sponges; -- called also Spongiae, Spongida, and Spongiozoa. The principal divisions are Calcispongiae, Keratosa or Fibrospongiae, and Silicea.

Porime (n.) A theorem or proposition so easy of demonstration as to be almost self-evident.

Porites (n.) An important genus of reef-building corals having small twelve-rayed calicles, and a very porous coral. Some species are branched, others grow in large massive or globular forms.

Position (n.) A method of solving a problem by one or two suppositions; -- called also the rule of trial and error.

Positive (a.) Having a real position, existence, or energy; existing in fact; real; actual; -- opposed to negative.

Positive (a.) Derived from an object by itself; not dependent on changing circumstances or relations; absolute; -- opposed to relative; as, the idea of beauty is not positive, but depends on the different tastes individuals.

Positive (a.) Definitely laid down; explicitly stated; clearly expressed; -- opposed to implied; as, a positive declaration or promise.

Positive (a.) Fully assured; confident; certain; sometimes, overconfident; dogmatic; overbearing; -- said of persons.

Positive (a.) Electro-positive.

Positive (a.) Hence, basic; metallic; not acid; -- opposed to negative, and said of metals, bases, and basic radicals.

Positively (adv.) In a positive manner; absolutely; really; expressly; with certainty; indubitably; peremptorily; dogmatically; -- opposed to negatively.

Positive (a.) Designating, or pertaining to, a device giving a to-and-fro motion; as, a positive dobby.

Preignition (n.) Ignition in an internal-combustion engine while the inlet valve is open or before compression is completed.

Praisable (a.) Fit to be praised; praise-worthy; laudable; commendable.

Praise (v.) To commend; to applaud; to express approbation of; to laud; -- applied to a person or his acts.

Praise (v.) To extol in words or song; to magnify; to glorify on account of perfections or excellent works; to do honor to; to display the excellence of; -- applied especially to the Divine Being.

Punish (v. t.) To deal with roughly or harshly; -- chiefly used with regard to a contest; as, our troops punished the enemy.

Punishable (a.) Deserving of, or liable to, punishment; capable of being punished by law or right; -- said of person or offenses.

Pupigerous (a.) Bearing or containing a pupa; -- said of dipterous larvae which do not molt when the pupa is formed within them.

Pupiparous (a.) Bearing, or containing, a pupa; -- said of the matured larvae, or larval skins, of certain Diptera.

Purism (n.) Rigid purity; the quality of being affectedly pure or nice, especially in the choice of language; over-solicitude as to purity.

Puritan (n.) One who, in the time of Queen Elizabeth and the first two Stuarts, opposed traditional and formal usages, and advocated simpler forms of faith and worship than those established by law; -- originally, a term of reproach. The Puritans formed the bulk of the early population of New England.

Puritan (n.) One who is scrupulous and strict in his religious life; -- often used reproachfully or in contempt; one who has overstrict notions.

Puritanical (a.) Precise in observance of legal or religious requirements; strict; overscrupulous; rigid; -- often used by way of reproach or contempt.

Pusillanimous (a.) Destitute of a manly or courageous strength and firmness of mind; of weak spirit; mean-spirited; spiritless; cowardly; -- said of persons, as, a pussillanimous prince.

Pyriform (a.) Having the form of a pear; pear-shaped.

Pyrite (n.) A common mineral of a pale brass-yellow color and brilliant metallic luster, crystallizing in the isometric system; iron pyrites; iron disulphide.

Quail (n.) A prostitute; -- so called because the quail was thought to be a very amorous bird.

Quoit (n.) A flattened ring-shaped piece of iron, to be pitched at a fixed object in play; hence, any heavy flat missile used for the same purpose, as a stone, piece of iron, etc.

Radiotelegraphy (n.) Telegraphy using the radiant energy of electrical (Hertzian) waves; wireless telegraphy; -- the term adopted for use by the Radiotelegraphic Convention of 1912.

Radiant (a.) Giving off rays; -- said of a bearing; as, the sun radiant; a crown radiant.

Radiant (a.) Having a raylike appearance, as the large marginal flowers of certain umbelliferous plants; -- said also of the cluster which has such marginal flowers.

Radical (a.) Hence: Of or pertaining to the root or origin; reaching to the center, to the foundation, to the ultimate sources, to the principles, or the like; original; fundamental; thorough-going; unsparing; extreme; as, radical evils; radical reform; a radical party.

Radical (n.) One who advocates radical changes in government or social institutions, especially such changes as are intended to level class inequalities; -- opposed to conservative.

Radical (n.) Specifically, a group of two or more atoms, not completely saturated, which are so linked that their union implies certain properties, and are conveniently regarded as playing the part of a single atom; a residue; -- called also a compound radical. Cf. Residue.

Radicated (a.) Having roots, or possessing a well-developed root.

Radish (n.) The pungent fleshy root of a well-known cruciferous plant (Raphanus sativus); also, the whole plant.

Radius (n.) Radiating organs, or color-markings, of the radiates.

Ramie (n.) The grass-cloth plant (B/hmeria nivea); also, its fiber, which is very fine and exceedingly strong; -- called also China grass, and rhea. See Grass-cloth plant, under Grass.

Ranine (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a swelling under the tongue; also, pertaining to the region where the swelling occurs; -- applied especially to branches of the lingual artery and lingual vein.

Rapid (a.) The part of a river where the current moves with great swiftness, but without actual waterfall or cascade; -- usually in the plural; as, the Lachine rapids in the St. Lawrence.

Rational (a.) Expressing the type, structure, relations, and reactions of a compound; graphic; -- said of formulae. See under Formula.

Rationalism (n.) The system that makes rational power the ultimate test of truth; -- opposed to sensualism, or sensationalism, and empiricism.

Ravissant (a.) In a half-raised position, as if about to spring on prey.

Recipiangle (n.) An instrument with two arms that are pivoted together at one end, and a graduated arc, -- used by military engineers for measuring and laying off angles of fortifications.

Reciprocal (a.) Reflexive; -- applied to pronouns and verbs, but sometimes limited to such pronouns as express mutual action.

Recital (n.) A vocal or instrumental performance by one person; -- distinguished from concert; as, a song recital; an organ, piano, or violin recital.

Recitative (n.) A species of musical recitation in which the words are delivered in a manner resembling that of ordinary declamation; also, a piece of music intended for such recitation; -- opposed to melisma.

Redingote (n.) A long plain double-breasted outside coat for women.

Redintegration (n.) The law that objects which have been previously combined as part of a single mental state tend to recall or suggest one another; -- adopted by many philosophers to explain the phenomena of the association of ideas.

Redirect (a.) Applied to the examination of a witness, by the party calling him, after the cross-examination.

Regimen (n.) a systematic course of diet, etc., pursed with a view to improving or preserving the health, or for the purpose of attaining some particular effect, as a reduction of flesh; -- sometimes used synonymously with hygiene.

Regimentals (n. pl.) The uniform worn by the officers and soldiers of a regiment; military dress; -- formerly used in the singular in the same sense.

Registering (a.) Recording; -- applied to instruments; having an apparatus which registers; as, a registering thermometer. See Recording.

Registrant (n.) One who registers; esp., one who , by virtue of securing an official registration, obtains a certain right or title of possession, as to a trade-mark.

Remiped (a.) Having feet or legs that are used as oars; -- said of certain crustaceans and insects.

Remittitur (n.) A remission or surrender, -- remittitur damnut being a remission of excess of damages.

Residence (n.) The residing of an incumbent on his benefice; -- opposed to nonresidence.

Resident (a.) Dwelling, or having an abode, in a place for a continued length of time; residing on one's own estate; -- opposed to nonresident; as, resident in the city or in the country.

Resident (n.) A diplomatic representative who resides at a foreign court; -- a term usualy applied to ministers of a rank inferior to that of ambassadors. See the Note under Minister, 4.

Residue (n.) That which remains of a molecule after the removal of a portion of its constituents; hence, an atom or group regarded as a portion of a molecule; -- used as nearly equivalent to radical, but in a more general sense.

Residue (n.) Any positive or negative number that differs from a given number by a multiple of a given modulus; thus, if 7 is the modulus, and 9 the given number, the numbers -5, 2, 16, 23, etc., are residues.

Resign (v. t.) To sign back; to return by a formal act; to yield to another; to surrender; -- said especially of office or emolument. Hence, to give up; to yield; to submit; -- said of the wishes or will, or of something valued; -- also often used reflexively.

Retiary (a.) Constructing or using a web, or net, to catch prey; -- said of certain spiders.

Reticulum (n.) The second stomach of ruminants, in which folds of the mucous membrane form hexagonal cells; -- also called the honeycomb stomach.

Retinol (n.) A hydrocarbon oil obtained by the distillation of resin, -- used in printer's ink.

Retiracy (n.) Retirement; -- mostly used in a jocose or burlesque way.

Retire (v. t.) To withdraw; to take away; -- sometimes used reflexively.

Retitelae (n. pl.) A group of spiders which spin irregular webs; -- called also Retitelariae.

Revival (n.) Reanimation from a state of langour or depression; -- applied to the health, spirits, and the like.

Revivor (n.) Revival of a suit which is abated by the death or marriage of any of the parties, -- done by a bill of revivor.

Remise (n.) A livery carriage of a kind superior to an ordinary fiacre; -- so called because kept in a remise.

Ricinine (n.) A bitter white crystalRicinoleate (n.) A salt of ricinoleic acid; -- formerly called palmate.

Ricinolein (n.) The glycerin salt of ricinoleic acid, occuring as a characteristic constituent of castor oil; -- formerly called palmin.

Ricinus (n.) A genus of plants of the Spurge family, containing but one species (R. communis), the castor-oil plant. The fruit is three-celled, and contains three large seeds from which castor oil iss expressed. See Palma Christi.

Ridicule (n.) Remarks concerning a subject or a person designed to excite laughter with a degree of contempt; wit of that species which provokes contemptuous laughter; disparagement by making a person an object of laughter; banter; -- a term lighter than derision.

Riding (n.) One of the three jurisdictions into which the county of York, in England, is divided; -- formerly under the government of a reeve. They are called the North, the East, and the West, Riding.

Rigidity (n.) The quality or state of being rigid; want of pliability; the quality of resisting change of form; the amount of resistance with which a body opposes change of form; -- opposed to flexibility, ductility, malleability, and softness.

Ripidolite (n.) A translucent mineral of a green color and micaceous structure, belonging to the chlorite group; a hydrous silicate of alumina, magnesia, and iron; -- called also clinochlore.

Ripieno (a.) Filling up; supplementary; supernumerary; -- a term applied to those instruments which only swell the mass or tutti of an orchestra, but are not obbligato.

Robin (n.) A small European singing bird (Erythacus rubecula), having a reddish breast; -- called also robin redbreast, robinet, and ruddock.

Robin (n.) An American singing bird (Merula migratoria), having the breast chestnut, or dull red. The upper parts are olive-gray, the head and tail blackish. Called also robin redbreast, and migratory thrush.

Robin (n.) Any one of several species of Australian warblers of the genera Petroica, Melanadrays, and allied genera; as, the scarlet-breasted robin (Petroica mullticolor).

Robinet (n.) The chaffinch; -- called also roberd.

Romic (n.) A method of notation for all spoken sounds, proposed by Mr. Sweet; -- so called because it is based on the common Roman-letter alphabet. It is like the palaeotype of Mr. Ellis in the general plan, but simpler.

Romish (a.) Belonging or relating to Rome, or to the Roman Catholic Church; -- frequently used in a disparaging sense; as, the Romish church; the Romish religion, ritual, or ceremonies.

Rosicrucian (n.) One who, in the 17th century and the early part of the 18th, claimed to belong to a secret society of philosophers deeply versed in the secrets of nature, -- the alleged society having existed, it was stated, several hundred years.

Rosin (n.) The hard, amber-colored resin left after distilling off the volatile oil of turpentine; colophony.

Rotiform (a.) Wheel-shaped; as, rotiform appendages.

Rubian (n.) One of several color-producing glycosides found in madder root.

Rubican (a.) Colored a prevailing red, bay, or black, with flecks of white or gray especially on the flanks; -- said of horses.

Rubiginous (a.) Having the appearance or color of iron rust; rusty-looking.

Rudistes (n. pl.) An extinct order or suborder of bivalve mollusks characteristic of the Cretaceous period; -- called also Rudista. See Illust. under Hippurite.

Rumination (n.) The regurgitation of food from the stomach after it has been swallowed, -- occasionally observed as a morbid phenomenon in man.

RupicoRytina (n.) A genus of large edentulous sirenians, allied to the dugong and manatee, including but one species (R. Stelleri); -- called also Steller's sea cow.

Sagitta (n.) The distance from a point in a curve to the chord; also, the versed sine of an arc; -- so called from its resemblance to an arrow resting on the bow and string.

Sagitta (n.) A genus of transparent, free-swimming marine worms having lateral and caudal fins, and capable of swimming rapidly. It is the type of the class Chaetognatha.

Sagittary (n.) The Arsenal in Venice; -- so called from having a figure of an archer over the door.

Salient (v. i.) Projecting outwardly; as, a salient angle; -- opposed to reentering. See Illust. of Bastion.

Salifiable (a.) Capable of neutralizing an acid to form a salt; -- said of bases; thus, ammonia is salifiable.

Saligenin (n.) A phenol alcohol obtained, by the decomposition of salicin, as a white crystalSaSanidine (n.) A variety of orthoclase feldspar common in certain eruptive rocks, as trachyte; -- called also glassy feldspar.

Sapient (a.) Wise; sage; discerning; -- often in irony or contempt.

Satiate (a.) Filled to satiety; glutted; sated; -- followed by with or of.

Satinwood (n.) The hard, lemon-colored, fragrant wood of an East Indian tree (Chloroxylon Swietenia). It takes a lustrous finish, and is used in cabinetwork. The name is also given to the wood of a species of prickly ash (Xanthoxylum Caribaeum) growing in Florida and the West Indies.

Savine (n.) A coniferous shrub (Juniperus Sabina) of Western Asia, occasionally found also in the northern parts of the United States and in British America. It is a compact bush, with dark-colored foliage, and produces small berries having a glaucous bloom. Its bitter, acrid tops are sometimes used in medicine for gout, amenorrhoea, etc.

Saxicavous (a.) Boring, or hollowing out, rocks; -- said of certain mollusks which live in holes which they burrow in rocks. See Illust. of Lithodomus.

SaxicoSchizognathous (a.) Having the maxillo-palatine bones separate from each other and from the vomer, which is pointed in front, as in the gulls, snipes, grouse, and many other birds.

Schizomycetes (n. pl.) An order of Schizophyta, including the so-called fission fungi, or bacteria. See Schizophyta, in the Supplement.

Scribe (v. t.) To cut (anything) in such a way as to fit closely to a somewhat irregular surface, as a baseboard to a floor which is out of level, a board to the curves of a molding, or the like; -- so called because the workman marks, or scribe, with the compasses the Scriber (n.) A sharp-pointed tool, used by joiners for drawing Scrim (n.) A kind of light cotton or Scripture (n.) The books of the Old and the new Testament, or of either of them; the Bible; -- used by way of eminence or distinction, and chiefly in the plural.

Seeing (conj. (but originally a present participle)) In view of the fact (that); considering; taking into account (that); insmuch as; since; because; -- followed by a dependent clause; as, he did well, seeing that he was so young.

Semibreve (n.) A note of half the time or duration of the breve; -- now usually called a whole note. It is the longest note in general use.

Semicupium (n.) A half bath, or one that covers only the lewer extremities and the hips; a sitz-bath; a half bath, or hip bath.

Semidemiquaver (n.) A demisemiquaver; a thirty-second note.

Semidouble (a.) Having the outermost stamens converted into petals, while the inner ones remain perfect; -- said of a flower.

Semifloscule (n.) A floscule, or florest, with its corolla prolonged into a strap-shaped petal; -- called also semifloret.

Semihoral (a.) Half-hourly.

Seminiferous (a.) Seed-bearing; producing seed; pertaining to, or connected with, the formation of semen; as, seminiferous cells or vesicles.

Seminose (n.) A carbohydrate of the glucose group found in the thickened endosperm of certain seeds, and extracted as yellow sirup having a sweetish-bitter taste.

Semipalmated (a.) Having the anterior toes joined only part way down with a web; half-webbed; as, a semipalmate bird or foot. See Illust. k under Aves.

Semiquartile (n.) An aspect of the planets when distant from each other the half of a quadrant, or forty-five degrees, or one sign and a half.

Semiquaver (n.) A note of half the duration of the quaver; -- now usually called a sixsteenth note.

Semiquintile (n.) An aspect of the planets when distant from each other half of the quintile, or thirty-six degrees.

Semitone (n.) Half a tone; -- the name commonly applied to the smaller intervals of the diatonic scale.

Senior (n.) One in the fourth or final year of his collegiate course at an American college; -- originally called senior sophister; also, one in the last year of the course at a professional schools or at a seminary.

Sericin (n.) A gelatinous nitrogenous material extracted from crude silk and other similar fiber by boiling water; -- called also silk gelatin.

Setiparous (a.) Producing setae; -- said of the organs from which the setae of annelids arise.

Sexifid (a.) Six-cleft; as, a sexfid calyx or nectary.

Seminar (n.) A group of students engaged, under the guidance of an instructor, in original research in a particular Semitontine (a.) Lit., half-tontine; -- used to designate a form of tontine life insurance. See Tontine insurance.

Series (n.) A mode of arranging the separate parts of a circuit by connecting them successively end to end to form a single path for the current; -- opposed to parallel. The parts so arranged are said to be in series.

Shrine (n.) Short for Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, a secret order professedly originated by one Kalif Alu, a son-in-law of Mohammed, at Mecca, in the year of the Hegira 25 (about 646 a. d.) In the modern order, established in the United States in 1872, only Knights Templars or thirty-second degree Masons are eligible for admission, though the order itself is not Masonic.

Shrill (v. i.) Acute; sharp; piercing; having or emitting a sharp, piercing tone or sound; -- said of a sound, or of that which produces a sound.

Shrimp (v.) Figuratively, a little wrinkled man; a dwarf; -- in contempt.

Shrive (v. t.) To hear or receive the confession of; to administer confession and absolution to; -- said of a priest as the agent.

Shrive (v. t.) To confess, and receive absolution; -- used reflexively.

Shrivel (v. i.) To draw, or be drawn, into wrinkles; to shrink, and form corrugations; as, a leaf shriveles in the hot sun; the skin shrivels with age; -- often with up.

Siciliano (n.) A Sicilian dance, resembling the pastorale, set to a rather slow and graceful melody in 12-8 or 6-8 measure; also, the music to the dance.

Sifilet (n.) The six-shafted bird of paradise. See Paradise bird, under Paradise.

Sigillaria (n.) A genus of fossil trees principally found in the coal formation; -- so named from the seallike leaf scars in vertical rows on the surface.

Sigillated (a.) Decorated by means of stamps; -- said of pottery.

Simia (n.) A Linnaean genus of Quadrumana which included the types of numerous modern genera. By modern writers it is usually restricted to the genus which includes the orang-outang.

Sinister (a.) On the left hand, or the side of the left hand; left; -- opposed to dexter, or right.

Sinister (a.) Unlucky; inauspicious; disastrous; injurious; evil; -- the left being usually regarded as the unlucky side; as, sinister influences.

Sinistral (a.) Having the whorls of the spire revolving or rising to the left; reversed; -- said of certain spiral shells.

Sinistrin (n.) A mucilaginous carbohydrate, resembling achroodextrin, extracted from squill as a colorless amorphous substance; -- so called because it is levorotatory.

Sinistrorse (a.) Turning to the left (of the spectator) in the ascending Skein (n.) A quantity of yarn, thread, or the like, put up together, after it is taken from the reel, -- usually tied in a sort of knot.

Sleigh (n.) A vehicle moved on runners, and used for transporting persons or goods on snow or ice; -- in England commonly called a sledge.

Split (n.) Any of the three or four strips into which osiers are commonly cleft for certain kinds of work; -- usually in pl.

Split (n.) A small bottle (containing about half a pint) of some drink; -- so called as containing half the quantity of the customary smaller commercial size of bottle; also, a drink of half the usual quantity; a half glass.

Split (a.) Divided so as to be done or executed part at one time or price and part at another time or price; -- said of an order, sale, etc.

Sluice (n.) A long box or trough through which water flows, -- used for washing auriferous earth.

Snail (n.) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial air-breathing gastropods belonging to the genus Helix and many allied genera of the family Helicidae. They are abundant in nearly all parts of the world except the arctic regions, and feed almost entirely on vegetation; a land snail.

Snail (n.) Any gastropod having a general resemblance to the true snails, including fresh-water and marine species. See Pond snail, under Pond, and Sea snail.

Snail (n.) Hence, a drone; a slow-moving person or thing.

Socialism (n.) A theory or system of social reform which contemplates a complete reconstruction of society, with a more just and equitable distribution of property and labor. In popular usage, the term is often employed to indicate any lawless, revolutionary social scheme. See Communism, Fourierism, Saint-Simonianism, forms of socialism.

Solicit (v. t.) To disturb; to disquiet; -- a Latinism rarely used.

Solicitor (n.) An attorney or advocate; one who represents another in court; -- formerly, in English practice, the professional designation of a person admitted to practice in a court of chancery or equity. See the Note under Attorney.

Solid (a.) Having the constituent parts so compact, or so firmly adhering, as to resist the impression or penetration of other bodies; having a fixed form; hard; firm; compact; -- opposed to fluid and liquid or to plastic, like clay, or to incompact, like sand.

Solid (a.) Applied to a compound word whose parts are closely united and form an unbroken word; -- opposed to hyphened.

Solid (a.) Impenetrable; resisting or excluding any other material particle or atom from any given portion of space; -- applied to the supposed ultimate particles of matter.

Solidago (n.) A genus of yellow-flowered composite perennial herbs; golden-rod.

Solidity (n.) The state or quality of being solid; density; consistency, -- opposed to fluidity; compactness; fullness of matter, -- opposed to openness or hollowness; strength; soundness, -- opposed to weakness or instability; the primary quality or affection of matter by which its particles exclude or resist all others; hardness; massiveness.

Solidity (n.) Moral firmness; soundness; strength; validity; truth; certainty; -- as opposed to weakness or fallaciousness; as, the solidity of arguments or reasoning; the solidity of principles, triuths, or opinions.

Solifidian (n.) One who maintains that faith alone, without works, is sufficient for justification; -- opposed to nullifidian.

Solifugae (n. pl.) A division of arachnids having large, powerful fangs and a segmented abdomen; -- called also Solpugidea, and Solpugides.

Solitaire (n.) A game which one person can play alone; -- applied to many games of cards, etc.; also, to a game played on a board with pegs or balls, in which the object is, beginning with all the places filled except one, to remove all but one of the pieces by "jumping," as in draughts.

Solitaire (n.) Any species of American thrushlike birds of the genus Myadestes. They are noted their sweet songs and retiring habits. Called also fly-catching thrush. A West Indian species (Myadestes sibilans) is called the invisible bird.

Solitude (a.) Remoteness from society; destitution of company; seclusion; -- said of places; as, the solitude of a wood.

Speight (n.) A woodpecker; -- called also specht, spekt, spight.

Sphinx (n.) On Greek art and mythology, a she-monster, usually represented as having the winged body of a lion, and the face and breast of a young woman.

Sphinx (n.) Any one of numerous species of large moths of the family Sphingidae; -- called also hawk moth.

Splice (v. t.) To unite, as two ropes, or parts of a rope, by a particular manner of interweaving the strands, -- the union being between two ends, or between an end and the body of a rope.

Split (v. t.) To divide or separate into components; -- often used with up; as, to split up sugar into alcohol and carbonic acid.

Split (n.) the substitution of more than one share of a corporation's stock for one share. The market price of the stock usually drops in proportion to the increase in outstanding shares of stock. The split may be in any ratio, as a two-for-one split; a three-for-two split.

Spoil (v. t.) To plunder; to strip by violence; to pillage; to rob; -- with of before the name of the thing taken; as, to spoil one of his goods or possession.

Spoil (n.) Public offices and their emoluments regarded as the peculiar property of a successful party or faction, to be bestowed for its own advantage; -- commonly in the plural; as to the victor belong the spoils.

Sprig (n.) A youth; a lad; -- used humorously or in slight disparagement.

Sprigtail (n.) The pintail duck; -- called also sprig, and spreet-tail.

Sprigtail (n.) The sharp-tailed grouse.

Spring (v. i.) To shoot up, out, or forth; to come to the light; to begin to appear; to emerge; as a plant from its seed, as streams from their source, and the like; -often followed by up, forth, or out.

Spring (v. t.) To bend by force, as something stiff or strong; to force or put by bending, as a beam into its sockets, and allowing it to straighten when in place; -- often with in, out, etc.; as, to spring in a slat or a bar.

Squid (n.) Any one of numerous species of ten-armed cephalopods having a long, tapered body, and a caudal fin on each side; especially, any species of Loligo, Ommastrephes, and related genera. See Calamary, Decacerata, Dibranchiata.

Squilgee (n.) Formerly, a small swab for drying a vessel's deck; now, a kind of scraper having a blade or edge of rubber or of leather, -- used for removing superfluous, water or other liquids, as from a vessel's deck after washing, from window panes, photographer's plates, etc.

Squinancy (n.) A European perennial herb (Asperula cynanchica) with narrowly Squinch (n.) A small arch thrown across the corner of a square room to support a superimposed mass, as where an octagonal spire or drum rests upon a square tower; -- called also sconce, and sconcheon.

Squint (a.) Looking obliquely. Specifically (Med.), not having the optic axes coincident; -- said of the eyes. See Squint, n., 2.

Squint (v. i.) To have the axes of the eyes not coincident; -- to be cross-eyed.

Squire (n.) A shield-bearer or armor-bearer who attended a knight.

Squireen (n.) One who is half squire and half farmer; -- used humorously.

Squirt (v. i.) To be thrown out, or ejected, in a rapid stream, from a narrow orifice; -- said of liquids.

Squitee (n.) The squeteague; -- called also squit.

Staidness (n.) The quality or state of being staid; seriousness; steadiness; sedateness; regularity; -- the opposite of wildness, or levity.

Stair (n.) One step of a series for ascending or descending to a different level; -- commonly applied to those within a building.

Stair (n.) A series of steps, as for passing from one story of a house to another; -- commonly used in the plural; but originally used in the singular only.

Steinbock (n.) A small South African antelope (Nanotragus tragulus) which frequents dry, rocky districts; -- called also steenbok.

Stricken (v. t.) Whole; entire; -- said of the hour as marked by the striking of a clock.

Strict (a.) Upright, or straight and narrow; -- said of the shape of the plants or their flower clusters.

Strigine (a.) Of or pertaining to owls; owl-like.

Strike (v. t.) To advance; to cause to go forward; -- used only in past participle.

Strike (v. i.) To break forth; to commence suddenly; -- with into; as, to strike into reputation; to strike into a run.

Strike (v. i.) To become attached to something; -- said of the spat of oysters.

Strip (v. t.) To remove fiber, flock, or lint from; -- said of the teeth of a card when it becomes partly clogged.

Strive (v. i.) To struggle in opposition; to be in contention or dispute; to contend; to contest; -- followed by against or with before the person or thing opposed; as, strive against temptation; strive for the truth.

Strike (n.) Same as Ten-strike.

String (n.) The String (n.) A hoax; a trumped-up or "fake" story.

Supine (a.) Lying on the back, or with the face upward; -- opposed to prone.

Supine (n.) A verbal noun; or (according to C.F.Becker), a case of the infinitive mood ending in -um and -u, that in -um being sometimes called the former supine, and that in -u the latter supine.

Swain (n.) A young man dwelling in the country; a rustic; esp., a cuntry gallant or lover; -- chiefly in poetry.

Syringa (n.) The mock orange; -- popularly so called because its stems were formerly used as pipestems.

Syringe (n.) A kind of small hand-pump for throwing a stream of liquid, or for purposes of aspiration. It consists of a small cylindrical barrel and piston, or a bulb of soft elastic material, with or without valves, and with a nozzle which is sometimes at the end of a flexible tube; -- used for injecting animal bodies, cleansing wounds, etc.

Syringin (n.) A glucoside found in the bark of the lilac (Syringa) and extracted as a white crystalSyringotome (n.) A small blunt-pointed bistoury, -- used in syringotomy.

Syrinx (n.) A wind instrument made of reeds tied together; -- called also pandean pipes.

Talipot (n.) A beautiful tropical palm tree (Corypha umbraculifera), a native of Ceylon and the Malabar coast. It has a trunk sixty or seventy feet high, bearing a crown of gigantic fan-shaped leaves which are used as umbrellas and as fans in ceremonial processions, and, when cut into strips, as a substitute for writing paper.

Tapir (n.) Any one of several species of large odd-toed ungulates belonging to Tapirus, Elasmognathus, and allied genera. They have a long prehensile upper lip, short ears, short and stout legs, a short, thick tail, and short, close hair. They have three toes on the hind feet, and four toes on the fore feet, but the outermost toe is of little use.

Taring (n.) The common tern; -- called also tarret, and tarrock.

Terin (n.) A small yellow singing bird, with an ash-colored head; the European siskin. Called also tarin.

Theist (n.) One who believes in the existence of a God; especially, one who believes in a personal God; -- opposed to atheist.

Titi (n.) A tree of the southern United States (Cliftonia monophylla) having glossy leaves and racemes of fragrant white flowers succeeded by one-seeded drupes; -- called also black titi, buckwheat tree, and ironwood.

Totipalmate (a.) Having all four toes united by a web; -- said of certain sea birds, as the pelican and the gannet. See Illust. under Aves.

Towilly (n.) The sanderling; -- so called from its cry.

Trailer (n.) A car coupled to, and drawn by, a motor car in front of it; -- used esp. of such cars on street railroads. Called also trail car.

Truite (a.) Having a delicately crackled surface; -- applied to porcelian, etc.

Trail (n.) The entrails of a fowl, especially of game, as the woodcock, and the like; -- applied also, sometimes, to the entrails of sheep.

Train (v.) A roll train; as, a 12-inch train.

Trainband (n.) A band or company of an organized military force instituted by James I. and dissolved by Charles II.; -- afterwards applied to the London militia.

Truism (n.) An undoubted or self-evident truth; a statement which is pliantly true; a proposition needing no proof or argument; -- opposed to falsism.

Tubipora (n.) A genus of halcyonoids in which the skeleton, or coral (called organ-pipe coral), consists of a mass of parallel cylindrical tubes united at intervals by transverse plates. These corals are usually red or purple and form large masses. They are natives of the tropical parts of the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

Tulipomania (n.) A violent passion for the acquisition or cultivation of tulips; -- a word said by Beckman to have been coined by Menage.

Tulipwood (n.) The beautiful rose-colored striped wood of a Brazilian tree (Physocalymna floribunda), much used by cabinetmakers for inlaying.

Tunic (n.) An under-garment worn by the ancient Romans of both sexes. It was made with or without sleeves, reached to or below the knees, and was confined at the waist by a girdle.

Tunic (n.) Any similar garment worm by ancient or Oriental peoples; also, a common name for various styles of loose-fitting under-garments and over-garments worn in modern times by Europeans and others.

Tunicated (a.) Having each joint buried in the preceding funnel-shaped one, as in certain antennae of insects.

Tunicle (n.) A short, close-fitting vestment worn by bishops under the dalmatic, and by subdeacons.

Twain (a. & n.) Two; -- nearly obsolete in common discourse, but used in poetry and burlesque.

Tupian (a.) Designating, or pert. to, a linguistic stock of South American Indians comprising the most important Brazilian tribes. Agriculture, pottery, and stone working were practiced by them at the time of the conquest. The Tupi and the Guarani were originally the most powerful of the stock, which is hence also called Tupi-Guaranian.

Twaite (n.) A European shad; -- called also twaite shad. See Shad.

Ultimo () In the month immediately preceding the present; as, on the 1st ultimo; -- usually abbreviated to ult. Cf. Proximo.

Umbilicated (a.) Depressed in the middle, like a navel, as a flower, fruit, or leaf; navel-shaped; having an umbilicus; as, an umbilicated smallpox vesicle.

Umbilication (n.) A slight, navel-like depression, or dimpling, of the center of a rounded body; as, the umbilication of a smallpox vesicle; also, the condition of being umbilicated.

Undifferentiated (a.) Not differentiated; specifically (Biol.), homogenous, or nearly so; -- said especially of young or embryonic tissues which have not yet undergone differentiation (see Differentiation, 3), that is, which show no visible separation into their different structural parts.

Until (prep.) To; unto; towards; -- used of material objects.

Until (prep.) To; up to; till; before; -- used of time; as, he staid until evening; he will not come back until the end of the month.

Urtical (a.) Resembling nettles; -- said of several natural orders allied to urticaceous plants.

Urtication (n.) The act or process of whipping or stinging with nettles; -- sometimes used in the treatment of paralysis.

Utricle (n.) A small, thin-walled, one-seeded fruit, as of goosefoot.

Utricular (a.) Resembling a utricle or bag, whether large or minute; -- said especially with reference to the condition of certain substances, as sulphur, selenium, etc., when condensed from the vaporous state and deposited upon cold bodies, in which case they assume the form of small globules filled with liquid.

Vaginopennous (a.) Having elytra; sheath-winged.

Variable (n.) A quantity which may increase or decrease; a quantity which admits of an infinite number of values in the same expression; a variable quantity; as, in the equation x2 - y2 = R2, x and y are variables.

Variable (n.) Those parts of the sea where a steady wind is not expected, especially the parts between the trade-wind belts.

Variance (n.) A disagreement or difference between two parts of the same legal proceeding, which, to be effectual, ought to agree, -- as between the writ and the declaration, or between the allegation and the proof.

Varicose (a.) Intended for the treatment of varicose veins; -- said of elastic stockings, bandages. and the like.

Varietas (n.) A variety; -- used in giving scientific names, and often abbreviated to var.

Variorum (a.) Containing notes by different persons; -- applied to a publication; as, a variorum edition of a book.

Variscite (n.) An apple-green mineral occurring in reniform masses. It is a hydrous phosphate of alumina.

Vaticanism (n.) The doctrine of papal supremacy; extreme views in support of the authority of the pope; ultramontanism; -- a term used only by persons who are not Roman Catholics.

Veridical (a.) Truth-telling; truthful; veracious.

Virial (n.) A certain function relating to a system of forces and their points of application, -- first used by Clausius in the investigation of problems in molecular physics.

Virile (a.) Having the nature, properties, or qualities, of an adult man; characteristic of developed manhood; hence, masterful; forceful; specifically, capable of begetting; -- opposed to womanly, feminine, and puerile; as, virile age, virile power, virile organs.

Vitiligo (n.) A rare skin disease consisting in the development of smooth, milk-white spots upon various parts of the body.

Vivipara (n. pl.) An artificial division of vertebrates including those that produce their young alive; -- opposed to Ovipara.

Viviparous (a.) Producing young in a living state, as most mammals, or as those plants the offspring of which are produced alive, either by bulbs instead of seeds, or by the seeds themselves germinating on the plant, instead of falling, as they usually do; -- opposed to oviparous.

Vomit (v. t.) To throw up; to eject from the stomach through the mouth; to disgorge; to puke; to spew out; -- often followed by up or out.

Wapinschaw (n.) An exhibition of arms. according to the rank of the individual, by all persons bearing arms; -- formerly made at certain seasons in each district.

Wariangle (n.) The red-backed shrike (Lanius collurio); -- called also wurger, worrier, and throttler.

Wraith (n.) Sometimes, improperly, a spirit thought to preside over the waters; -- called also water wraith.

Xeriff (n.) A gold coin formerly current in Egypt and Turkey, of the value of about 9s. 6d., or about $2.30; -- also, in Morocco, a ducat.

Xylic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or related to, xylene; specifically, designating any one of several metameric acids produced by the partial oxidation of mesitylene and pseudo-cumene.

Xylitone (n.) A yellow oil having a geraniumlike odor, produced as a side product in making phorone; -- called also xylite oil.

Xyris (n.) A genus of endogenous herbs with grassy leaves and small yellow flowers in short, scaly-bracted spikes; yellow-eyed grass. There are about seventeen species in the Atlantic United States.

Yenite (n.) A silicate of iron and lime occurring in black prismatic crystals; -- also called ilvaite.

Yawi (n.) A fore-and-aft-rigged vessel with a mainmast stepped a little farther forward than in a sloop and carrying a mainsail and jibs, with a jigger mast far aft, usually placed abaft the rudder post.

Ypsiliform (a.) Resembling the / in appearance; -- said of the germinal spot in the ripe egg at one of the stages of fecundation.

Ypsiloid (a.) In the form of the letter Y; Y-shaped.

Zenith (n.) That point in the visible celestial hemisphere which is vertical to the spectator; the point of the heavens directly overhead; -- opposed to nadir.

Zooid (n.) One of the individual animals in a composite group, as of Anthozoa, Hydroidea, and Bryozoa; -- sometimes restricted to those individuals in which the mouth and digestive organs are not developed.

Zymic (a.) Pertaining to, or produced by, fermentation; -- formerly, by confusion, used to designate lactic acid.

About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.