Words whose 6th letter is D

Abound (v. i.) To be copiously supplied; -- followed by in or with.

Accord (v. t.) Voluntary or spontaneous motion or impulse to act; -- preceded by own; as, of one's own accord.

Accord (v. t.) To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust; -- followed by to.

Accord (v. i.) To agree; to correspond; to be in harmony; -- followed by with, formerly also by to; as, his disposition accords with his looks.

Accordant (a.) Agreeing; consonant; harmonious; corresponding; conformable; -- followed by with or to.

Accordantly (adv.) In accordance or agreement; agreeably; conformably; -- followed by with or to.

Afford (v. t.) To incur, stand, or bear without serious detriment, as an act which might under other circumstances be injurious; -- with an auxiliary, as can, could, might, etc.; to be able or rich enough.

Alamode (n.) A thin, black silk for hoods, scarfs, etc.; -- often called simply mode.

Aliped (a.) Wing-footed, as the bat.

Almendron (n.) The lofty Brazil-nut tree.

Amphidisc (n.) A peculiar small siliceous spicule having a denticulated wheel at each end; -- found in freshwater sponges.

Amphidromical (a.) Pertaining to an Attic festival at the naming of a child; -- so called because the friends of the parents carried the child around the hearth and then named it.

Androdioecious (a.) Alt. of -diecious

Angled (a.) Having an angle or angles; -- used in compounds; as, right-angled, many-angled, etc.

Animadvert (v. i.) To take notice; to observe; -- commonly followed by that.

Animadvert (v. i.) To consider or remark by way of criticism or censure; to express censure; -- with on or upon.

Ankled (a.) Having ankles; -- used in composition; as, well-ankled.

Appendant (v. t.) Appended by prescription, that is, a personal usage for a considerable time; -- said of a thing of inheritance belonging to another inheritance which is superior or more worthy; as, an advowson, common, etc. , which may be appendant to a manor, common of fishing to a freehold, a seat in church to a house.

Appendicularia (n.) A genus of small free-swimming Tunicata, shaped somewhat like a tadpole, and remarkable for resemblances to the larvae of other Tunicata. It is the type of the order Copelata or Larvalia. See Illustration in Appendix.

Artiad (a.) Even; not odd; -- said of elementary substances and of radicals the valence of which is divisible by two without a remainder.

Artiodactyla (n. pl.) One of the divisions of the ungulate animals. The functional toes of the hind foot are even in number, and the third digit of each foot (corresponding to the middle finger in man) is asymmetrical and paired with the fourth digit, as in the hog, the sheep, and the ox; -- opposed to Perissodactyla.

Artiodactylous (a.) Even-toed.

Ascend (v. i.) To move upward; to mount; to go up; to rise; -- opposed to descend.

Ascendant (n.) An ancestor, or one who precedes in genealogy or degrees of kindred; a relative in the ascending Attend (v. i.) To apply the mind, or pay attention, with a view to perceive, understand, or comply; to pay regard; to heed; to listen; -- usually followed by to.

Attend (v. i.) To accompany or be present or near at hand, in pursuance of duty; to be ready for service; to wait or be in waiting; -- often followed by on or upon.

Avocado (n.) The pulpy fruit of Persea gratissima, a tree of tropical America. It is about the size and shape of a large pear; -- called also avocado pear, alligator pear, midshipman's butter.

Azured (a.) Of an azure color; sky-blue.

Backed (a.) Having a back; fitted with a back; as, a backed electrotype or stereotype plate. Used in composition; as, broad-backed; hump-backed.

Barbed (a.) Accoutered with defensive armor; -- said of a horse. See Barded ( which is the proper form.)

Barded (p.a.) Accoutered with defensive armor; -- said of a horse.

Beaked (a.) Having a beak or a beaklike point; beak-shaped.

Bedded (a.) Provided with a bed; as, double-bedded room; placed or arranged in a bed or beds.

Belladonna (n.) An herbaceous European plant (Atropa belladonna) with reddish bell-shaped flowers and shining black berries. The whole plant and its fruit are very poisonous, and the root and leaves are used as powerful medicinal agents. Its properties are largely due to the alkaloid atropine which it contains. Called also deadly nightshade.

Biacid (a.) Having two hydrogen atoms which can be replaced by negative atoms or radicals to form salts; -- said of bases. See Diacid.

Bicaudate (a.) Two-tailed; bicaudal.

Bilander (n.) A small two-masted merchant vessel, fitted only for coasting, or for use in canals, as in Holland.

Billed (a.) Furnished with, or having, a bill, as a bird; -- used in composition; as, broad-billed.

Bladed (a.) Having a blade or blades; as, a two-bladed knife.

Bocardo (n.) A prison; -- originally the name of the old north gate in Oxford, which was used as a prison.

Bodied (a.) Having a body; -- usually in composition; as, able-bodied.

Booted (a.) Having an undivided, horny, bootlike covering; -- said of the tarsus of some birds.

Brocade (n.) Silk stuff, woven with gold and silver threads, or ornamented with raised flowers, foliage, etc.; -- also applied to other stuffs thus wrought and enriched.

Browed (a.) Having (such) a brow; -- used in composition; as, dark-browed, stern-browed.

Bulbed (a.) Having a bulb; round-headed.

Caboodle (n.) The whole collection; the entire quantity or number; -- usually in the phrase the whole caboodle.

Calced (a.) Wearing shoes; calceated; -- in distintion from discalced or barefooted; as the calced Carmelites.

Carbide (n.) A binary compound of carbon with some other element or radical, in which the carbon plays the part of a negative; -- formerly termed carburet.

Cassideous (a.) Helmet-shaped; -- applied to a corolla having a broad, helmet-shaped upper petal, as in aconite.

Cathode (n.) The part of a voltaic battery by which the electric current leaves substances through which it passes, or the surface at which the electric current passes out of the electrolyte; the negative pole; -- opposed to anode.

Celandine (n.) A perennial herbaceous plant (Chelidonium majus) of the poppy family, with yellow flowers. It is used as a medicine in jaundice, etc., and its acrid saffron-colored juice is used to cure warts and the itch; -- called also greater celandine and swallowwort.

Chelidonius (n.) A small stone taken from the gizzard of a young swallow. -- anciently worn as a medicinal charm.

Chined (a.) Pertaining to, or having, a chine, or backbone; -- used in composition.

Cockade (n.) A badge, usually in the form of a rosette, or knot, and generally worn upon the hat; -- used as an indication of military or naval service, or party allegiance, and in England as a part of the livery to indicate that the wearer is the servant of a military or naval officer.

Coelodont (a.) Having hollow teeth; -- said of a group lizards.

Commodity (n.) That which affords convenience, advantage, or profit, especially in commerce, including everything movable that is bought and sold (except animals), -- goods, wares, merchandise, produce of land and manufactures, etc.

Confederate (a.) Of or pertaining to the government of the eleven Southern States of the United States which (1860-1865) attempted to establish an independent nation styled the Confederate States of America; as, the Confederate congress; Confederate money.

Confederate (n.) A name designating an adherent to the cause of the States which attempted to withdraw from the Union (1860-1865).

Confide (v. i.) To put faith (in); to repose confidence; to trust; -- usually followed by in; as, the prince confides in his ministers.

Confide (v. t.) To intrust; to give in charge; to commit to one's keeping; -- followed by to.

Confidence (n.) The act of confiding, trusting, or putting faith in; trust; reliance; belief; -- formerly followed by of, now commonly by in.

Confidence (n.) The state of mind characterized by one's reliance on himself, or his circumstances; a feeling of self-sufficiency; such assurance as leads to a feeling of security; self-reliance; -- often with self prefixed.

Confidence (n.) Having self-reliance; bold; undaunted.

Conoid (n.) A solid formed by the revolution of a conic section about its axis; as, a parabolic conoid, elliptic conoid, etc.; -- more commonly called paraboloid, ellipsoid, etc.

Considerable (a.) Of some distinction; noteworthy; influential; respectable; -- said of persons.

Consideration (n.) Attentive respect; appreciative regard; -- used especially in diplomatic or stately correspondence.

Corundum (n.) The earth alumina, as found native in a crystalCouped (a.) Cut off smoothly, as distinguished from erased; -- used especially for the head or limb of an animal. See Erased.

Coward (a.) Borne in the escutcheon with his tail doubled between his legs; -- said of a lion.

Crocidolite (n.) A mineral occuring in silky fibers of a lavender blue color. It is related to hornblende and is essentially a silicate of iron and soda; -- called also blue asbestus. A silicified form, in which the fibers penetrating quartz are changed to oxide of iron, is the yellow brown tiger-eye of the jewelers.

Crunodal (a.) Possessing, or characterized by, a crunode; -- used of curves.

Crusade (v. i.) To engage in a crusade; to attack in a zealous or hot-headed manner.

Cuboid (a.) Cube-shaped, or nearly so; as, the cuboid bone of the foot.

Cuspid (n.) One of the canine teeth; -- so called from having but one point or cusp on the crown. See Tooth.

Custody (n.) Judicial or penal safe-keeping.

Cylindroid (n.) A certain surface of the third degree, described by a moving straight Cystidea (n. pl.) An order of Crinoidea, mostly fossils of the Paleozoic rocks. They were usually roundish or egg-shaped, and often unsymmetrical; some were sessile, others had short stems.

Cytoid (a.) Cell-like; -- applied to the corpuscles of lymph, blood, chyle, etc.

Daffodil (n.) A plant of the genus Narcissus (N. Pseudo-narcissus). It has a bulbous root and beautiful flowers, usually of a yellow hue. Called also daffodilly, daffadilly, daffadowndilly, daffydowndilly, etc.

Defend (v. t.) To repel danger or harm from; to protect; to secure against; attack; to maintain against force or argument; to uphold; to guard; as, to defend a town; to defend a cause; to defend character; to defend the absent; -- sometimes followed by from or against; as, to defend one's self from, or against, one's enemies.

Defendant (n.) A person required to make answer in an action or suit; -- opposed to plaintiff.

Degraded (a.) Having steps; -- said of a cross each of whose extremities finishes in steps growing larger as they leave the center; -- termed also on degrees.

Depend (v. i.) To rely for support; to be conditioned or contingent; to be connected with anything, as a cause of existence, or as a necessary condition; -- followed by on or upon, formerly by of.

Depend (v. i.) To trust; to rest with confidence; to rely; to confide; to be certain; -- with on or upon; as, we depend on the word or assurance of our friends; we depend on the mail at the usual hour.

Dependent (a.) Relying on, or subject to, something else for support; not able to exist, or sustain itself, or to perform anything, without the will, power, or aid of something else; not self-sustaining; contingent or conditioned; subordinate; -- often with on or upon; as, dependent on God; dependent upon friends.

Dependent (n.) One who depends; one who is sustained by another, or who relies on another for support of favor; a hanger-on; a retainer; as, a numerous train of dependents.

Desmodont (n.) A member of a group of South American blood-sucking bats, of the genera Desmodus and Diphylla. See Vampire.

Devoid (v. t.) Destitute; not in possession; -- with of; as, devoid of sense; devoid of pity or of pride.

Diacid (a.) Divalent; -- said of a base or radical as capable of saturating two acid monad radicals or a dibasic acid. Cf. Dibasic, a., and Biacid.

Diamide (n.) Any compound containing two amido groups united with one or more acid or negative radicals, -- as distinguished from a diamine. Cf. Amido acid, under Amido, and Acid amide, under Amide.

Diffidence (n.) Distrust of one's self or one's own powers; lack of self-reliance; modesty; modest reserve; bashfulness.

Diffident (a.) Wanting confidence in one's self; distrustful of one's own powers; not self-reliant; timid; modest; bashful; characterized by modest reserve.

Earthdrake (n.) A mythical monster of the early Anglo-Saxon literature; a dragon.

Effendi (n.) Master; sir; -- a Turkish title of respect, applied esp. to a state official or man of learning, as one learned in the law, but often simply as the courtesy title of a gentleman.

Effendi (n.) Master; sir; -- a title of a Turkish state official and man of learning, especially one learned in the law.

Eisteddfod (n.) Am assembly or session of the Welsh bards; an annual congress of bards, minstrels and literati of Wales, -- being a patriotic revival of the old custom.

Enchodus (n.) A genus of extinct Cretaceous fishes; -- so named from their spear-shaped teeth. They were allied to the pike (Esox).

Enepidermic (a.) Applied to the skin without friction; -- said of medicines.

Epanody (n.) The abnormal change of an irregular flower to a regular form; -- considered by evolutionists to be a reversion to an ancestral condition.

Erased (p. pr. & a.) Represented with jagged and uneven edges, as is torn off; -- used esp. of the head or limb of a beast. Cf. Couped.

Extrude (v. t.) To shape or form by forcing metal heated to a semi-plastic condition through dies by the use of hydraulic power; as, extruded metal, extruded rods, extruded shapes.

Exceed (v. t.) To go beyond; to proceed beyond the given or supposed limit or measure of; to outgo; to surpass; -- used both in a good and a bad sense; as, one man exceeds another in bulk, stature, weight, power, skill, etc.; one offender exceeds another in villainy; his rank exceeds yours.

Exclude (v. t.) To shut out; to hinder from entrance or admission; to debar from participation or enjoyment; to deprive of; to except; -- the opposite to admit; as, to exclude a crowd from a room or house; to exclude the light; to exclude one nation from the ports of another; to exclude a taxpayer from the privilege of voting.

Expand (v. t.) To cause the particles or parts of to spread themselves or stand apart, thus increasing bulk without addition of substance; to make to occupy more space; to dilate; to distend; to extend every way; to enlarge; -- opposed to contract; as, to expand the chest; heat expands all bodies; to expand the sphere of benevolence.

Farandole (n.) A rapid dance in six-eight time in which a large number join hands and dance in various figures, sometimes moving from room to room. It originated in Provence.

Filanders (n. pl.) A disease in hawks, characterized by the presence of small threadlike worms, also of filaments of coagulated blood, from the rupture of a vein; -- called also backworm.

Florideae (n. pl.) A subclass of algae including all the red or purplish seaweeds; the Rhodospermeae of many authors; -- so called from the rosy or florid color of most of the species.

Friendly (n.) A friendly person; -- usually applied to natives friendly to foreign settlers or invaders.

Friended (a.) IncFusted (a.) Moldy; ill-smelling.

Gaited (a.) Having (such) a gait; -- used in composition; as, slow-gaited; heavy-gaited.

Ganoid (a.) Of or pertaining to Ganoidei. -- n. One of the Ganoidei.

Gerund (n.) A verbal noun ending in -e, preceded by to and usually denoting purpose or end; -- called also the dative infinitive; as, "Ic haebbe mete to etanne" (I have meat to eat.) In Modern English the name has been applied to verbal or participal nouns in -ing denoting a transitive action; e. g., by throwing a stone.

Glycide (n.) A colorless liquid, obtained from certain derivatives of glycerin, and regarded as a partially dehydrated glycerin; -- called also glycidic alcohol.

Grenadier (n.) Any marine fish of the genus Macrurus, in which the body and tail taper to a point; they mostly inhabit the deep sea; -- called also onion fish, and rat-tail fish.

Grenadier (n.) A bright-colored South African grosbeak (Pyromelana orix), having the back red and the lower parts black.

Grenadillo (n.) A handsome tropical American wood, much used for making flutes and other wind instruments; -- called also Grenada cocos, or cocus, and red ebony.

Ground (n.) One of the pieces of wood, flush with the plastering, to which moldings, etc., are attached; -- usually in the plural.

Groundnut (n.) A European plant of the genus Bunium (B. flexuosum), having an edible root of a globular shape and sweet, aromatic taste; -- called also earthnut, earth chestnut, hawknut, and pignut.

Gyroidal (a.) Having the planes arranged spirally, so that they incHabendum (n.) That part of a deed which follows the part called the premises, and determines the extent of the interest or estate granted; -- so called because it begins with the word Habendum.

Haemad (adv.) Toward the haemal side; on the haemal side of; -- opposed to neurad.

Haired (a.) In composition: Having (such) hair; as, red-haired.

Haloid (a.) Resembling salt; -- said of certain binary compounds consisting of a metal united to a negative element or radical, and now chiefly applied to the chlorides, bromides, iodides, and sometimes also to the fluorides and cyanides.

Hareld (n.) The long-tailed duck.

Harridan (n.) A worn-out strumpet; a vixenish woman; a hag.

Headed (a.) Furnished with a head (commonly as denoting intellectual faculties); -- used in composition; as, clear-headed, long-headed, thick-headed; a many-headed monster.

Herald (n.) In the Middle Ages, the officer charged with the above duties, and also with the care of genealogies, of the rights and privileges of noble families, and especially of armorial bearings. In modern times, some vestiges of this office remain, especially in England. See Heralds' College (below), and King-at-Arms.

Hermodactyl (n.) A heart-shaped bulbous root, about the size of a finger, brought from Turkey, formerly used as a cathartic.

Hexandrian (a.) Alt. of Hex-androus

Hilted (a.) Having a hilt; -- used in composition; as, basket-hilted, cross-hilted.

Hooded (a.) Hood-shaped; esp. (Bot.), rolled up like a cornet of paper; cuculate, as the spethe of the Indian turnip.

Hooded (a.) Having the head conspicuously different in color from the rest of the plumage; -- said of birds.

Iconodulist (n.) One who serves images; -- opposed to an iconoclast.

Illaudable (a.) Not laudable; not praise-worthy; worthy of censure or disapprobation.

Inched (a.) Having or measuring (so many) inches; as, a four-inched bridge.

Include (v. t.) To comprehend or comprise, as a genus the species, the whole a part, an argument or reason the inference; to contain; to embrace; as, this volume of Shakespeare includes his sonnets; he was included in the invitation to the family; to and including page twenty-five.

Indeed (adv.) In reality; in truth; in fact; verily; truly; -- used in a variety of sense. Esp.: (a) Denoting emphasis; as, indeed it is so. (b) Denoting concession or admission; as, indeed, you are right. (c) Denoting surprise; as, indeed, is it you? Its meaning is not intrinsic or fixed, but depends largely on the form of expression which it accompanies.

Infundibuliform (a.) Having the form of a funnel or cone; funnel-shaped.

Infundibulum (n.) A funnel-shaped or dilated organ or part; as, the infundibulum of the brain, a hollow, conical process, connecting the floor of the third ventricle with the pituitary body; the infundibula of the lungs, the enlarged terminations of the bronchial tubes.

Intend (v. t.) To fix the mind upon (something to be accomplished); to be intent upon; to mean; to design; to plan; to purpose; -- often followed by an infinitely with to, or a dependent clause with that; as, he intends to go; he intends that she shall remain.

Introduce (v. t.) To lead or bring in; to conduct or usher in; as, to introduce a person into a drawing-room.

Inward (a.) Being or placed within; inner; interior; -- opposed to outward.

Inward (n.) The mental faculties; -- usually pl.

Isopoda (n. pl.) An order of sessile-eyed Crustacea, usually having seven pairs of legs, which are all similar in structure.

Isopodiform (a.) Having the shape of an isopod; -- said of the larvae of certain insects.

Keeled (a.) Keel-shaped; having a longitudinal prominence on the back; as, a keeled leaf.

Kerned (a.) Having part of the face projecting beyond the body or shank; -- said of type.

Kilted (a.) Tucked or fastened up; -- said of petticoats, etc.

Lackaday (interj.) Alack the day; alas; -- an expression of sorrow, regret, dissatisfaction, or surprise.

Lapsed (a.) Having slipped downward, backward, or away; having lost position, privilege, etc., by neglect; -- restricted to figurative uses.

Leafed (a.) Having (such) a leaf or (so many) leaves; -- used in composition; as, broad-leafed; four-leafed.

Leaved (a.) Bearing, or having, a leaf or leaves; having folds; -- used in combination; as, a four-leaved clover; a two-leaved gate; long-leaved.

Legged (a.) Having (such or so many) legs; -- used in composition; as, a long-legged man; a two-legged animal.

Leonid (n.) One of the shooting stars which constitute the star shower that recurs near the fourteenth of November at intervals of about thirty-three years; -- so called because these shooting stars appear on the heavens to move in Lipped (a.) Having a lip or lips; having a raised or rounded edge resembling the lip; -- often used in composition; as, thick-lipped, thin-lipped, etc.

Liquidambar (n.) A genus consisting of two species of tall trees having star-shaped leaves, and woody burlike fruit. Liquidambar styraciflua is the North American sweet qum, and L. Orientalis is found in Asia Minor.

Liriodendron (n.) A genus of large and very beautiful trees of North America, having smooth, shining leaves, and handsome, tuliplike flowers; tulip tree; whitewood; -- called also canoewood. Liriodendron tulipifera is the only extant species, but there were several others in the Cretaceous epoch.

Lodged (a.) Lying down; -- used of beasts of the chase, as couchant is of beasts of prey.

Logged (a.) Made slow and heavy in movement; water-logged.

Masked (a.) Having the anterior part of the head differing decidedly in color from the rest of the plumage; -- said of birds.

Masted (a.) Furnished with a mast or masts; -- chiefly in composition; as, a three-masted schooner.

Mastodyny (n.) Pain occuring in the mamma or female breast, -- a form of neuralgia.

Meated (a.) Having (such) meat; -- used chiefly in composition; as, thick-meated.

Menhaden (n.) An American marine fish of the Herring familt (Brevoortia tyrannus), chiefly valuable for its oil and as a component of fertilizers; -- called also mossbunker, bony fish, chebog, pogy, hardhead, whitefish, etc.

Methodist (n.) One of a sect of Christians, the outgrowth of a small association called the "Holy Club," formed at Oxford University, A.D. 1729, of which the most conspicuous members were John Wesley and his brother Charles; -- originally so called from the methodical strictness of members of the club in all religious duties.

Methodist (n.) A person of strict piety; one who lives in the exact observance of religious duties; -- sometimes so called in contempt or ridicule.

Medjidieh (n.) A Turkish honorary order established in 1851 by Abdul-Mejid, having as its badge a medallion surrounded by seven silver rays and crescents. It is often conferred on foreigners.

Mockado (n.) A stuff made in imitation of velvet; -- probably the same as mock velvet.

Molybdenite (n.) A mineral occurring in soft, lead-gray, foliated masses or scales, resembling graphite; sulphide of molybdenum.

Molybdenum (n.) A rare element of the chromium group, occurring in nature in the minerals molybdenite and wulfenite, and when reduced obtained as a hard, silver-white, difficulty fusible metal. Symbol Mo. Atomic weight 95.9.

Monandry (n.) The possession by a woman of only one husband at the same time; -- contrasted with polyandry.

Musard (v. i.) A dreamer; an absent-minded person.

Mutandum (n.) A thing which is to be changed; something which must be altered; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Myrmidon (n.) A soldier or a subordinate civil officer who executes cruel orders of a superior without protest or pity; -- sometimes applied to bailiffs, constables, etc.

Neaped (a.) Left aground on the height of a spring tide, so that it will not float till the next spring tide; -- called also beneaped.

Necked (a.) Having (such) a neck; -- chiefly used in composition; as, stiff-necked.

Necked (a.) Cracked; -- said of a treenail.

Nerved (a.) Having nerves of a special character; as, weak-nerved.

Neurad (adv.) Toward the neural side; -- opposed to haemad.

nigged (n.) Hammer-dressed; -- said of building stone.

Notandum (n.) A thing to be noted or observed; a notable fact; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Ormazd (n.) Alt. of Ahura-Mazda

Obcordate (a.) Heart-shaped, with the attachment at the pointed end; inversely cordate: as, an obcordate petal or leaf.

Obtundent (n.) A substance which sheathes a part, or blunts irritation, usually some bland, oily, or mucilaginous matter; -- nearly the same as demulcent.

Occlude (v. t.) To take in and retain; to absorb; -- said especially with respect to gases; as iron, platinum, and palladium occlude large volumes of hydrogen.

Ocypodian (n.) One of a tribe of crabs which live in holes in the sand along the seashore, and run very rapidly, -- whence the name.

Oleander (n.) A beautiful evergreen shrub of the Dogbane family, having clusters of fragrant red or white flowers. It is native of the East Indies, but the red variety has become common in the south of Europe. Called also rosebay, rose laurel, and South-sea rose.

Omened (a.) Attended by, or containing, an omen or omens; as, happy-omened day.

Opetide (n.) Open time; -- applied to different things

Orthodox (a.) Sound in opinion or doctrine, especially in religious doctrine; hence, holding the Christian faith; believing the doctrines taught in the Scriptures; -- opposed to heretical and heterodox; as, an orthodox Christian.

Orthodoxy (n.) Soundness of faith; a belief in the doctrines taught in the Scriptures, or in some established standard of faith; -- opposed to heterodoxy or to heresy.

Orthodoxy (n.) Consonance to genuine Scriptural doctrines; -- said of moral doctrines and beliefs; as, the orthodoxy of a creed.

Orthodromics (n.) The art of sailing in a direct course, or on the arc of a great circle, which is the shortest distance between any two points on the surface of the globe; great-circle sailing; orthodromy.

Pachydermatous (a.) Thick-skinned; not sensitive to ridicule.

Palladic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, palladium; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which the element has a higher valence as contrasted with palladious compounds.

Palladious (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, palladium; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which palladium has a lower valence as compared with palladic compounds.

Palladium (n.) A rare metallic element of the light platinum group, found native, and also alloyed with platinum and gold. It is a silver-white metal resembling platinum, and like it permanent and untarnished in the air, but is more easily fusible. It is unique in its power of occluding hydrogen, which it does to the extent of nearly a thousand volumes, forming the alloy Pd2H. It is used for graduated circles and verniers, for plating certain silver goods, and somewhat in dentistry. It was so > Parted (a.) Cleft so that the divisions reach nearly, but not quite, to the midrib, or the base of the blade; -- said of a leaf, and used chiefly in composition; as, three-parted, five-parted, etc.

Pentadecane (n.) A hydrocarbon of the paraffin series, (C15H32) found in petroleum, tar oil, etc., and obtained as a colorless liquid; -- so called from the fifteen carbon atoms in the molecule.

Period (n.) A complete sentence, from one full stop to another; esp., a well-proportioned, harmonious sentence.

Peucedanin (n.) A tasteless white crystalPhiladelphian (n.) One of a society of mystics of the seventeenth century, -- called also the Family of Love.

Picard (n.) One of a sect of Adamites in the fifteenth century; -- so called from one Picard of Flanders. See Adamite.

Piccadilly (n.) A high, stiff collar for the neck; also, a hem or band about the skirt of a garment, -- worn by men in the 17th century.

Picked (a.) Having a pike or spine on the back; -- said of certain fishes.

Pluroderes (n. pl.) A group of fresh-water turtles in which the neck can not be retracted, but is bent to one side, for protection. The matamata is an example.

Podrida (n.) A miscellaneous dish of meats. See Olla-podrida.

Polled (a.) Deprived of a poll, or of something belonging to the poll. Specifically: (a) Lopped; -- said of trees having their tops cut off. (b) Cropped; hence, bald; -- said of a person. "The polled bachelor." Beau. & Fl. (c) Having cast the antlers; -- said of a stag. (d) Without horns; as, polled cattle; polled sheep.

Pomander (n.) A box to contain such perfume, formerly carried by ladies, as at the end of a chain; -- more properly pomander box.

Pompadour (n.) A crimson or pink color; also, a style of dress cut low and square in the neck; also, a mode of dressing the hair by drawing it straight back from the forehead over a roll; -- so called after the Marchioness de Pompadour of France. Also much used adjectively.

Precede (v. t.) To cause to be preceded; to preface; to introduce; -- used with by or with before the instrumental object.

Preceding (a.) Going before; -- opposed to following.

Prelude (v. t.) An introductory performance, preceding and preparing for the principal matter; a preliminary part, movement, strain, etc.; especially (Mus.), a strain introducing the theme or chief subject; a movement introductory to a fugue, yet independent; -- with recent composers often synonymous with overture.

Priced (a.) Rated in price; valued; as, high-priced goods; low-priced labor.

Propidene (n.) The unsymmetrical hypothetical hydrocarbon radical, CH3.CH2.CH, analogous to ethylidene, and regarded as the type of certain derivatives of propane; -- called also propylidene.

Provide (v. t.) To furnish; to supply; -- formerly followed by of, now by with.

Provide (v. i.) To procure supplies or means in advance; to take measures beforehand in view of an expected or a possible future need, especially a danger or an evil; -- followed by against or for; as, to provide against the inclemency of the weather; to provide for the education of a child.

Provided (conj.) On condition; by stipulation; with the understanding; if; -- usually followed by that; as, provided that nothing in this act shall prejudice the rights of any person whatever.

Provident (a.) Foreseeing wants and making provision to supply them; prudent in preparing for future exigencies; cautious; economical; -- sometimes followed by of; as, aprovident man; an animal provident of the future.

Pycnidium (n.) In certain fungi, a flask-shaped cavity from the surface of the inner walls of which spores are produced.

Raised (a.) Leavened; made with leaven, or yeast; -- used of bread, cake, etc., as distinguished from that made with cream of tartar, soda, etc. See Raise, v. t., 4.

Ramrod (n.) The rod used in ramming home the charge in a muzzle-loading firearm.

Recording (a.) Keeping a record or a register; as, a recording secretary; -- applied to numerous instruments with an automatic appliance which makes a record of their action; as, a recording gauge or telegraph.

Regard (v. t.) To have relation to, as bearing upon; to respect; to relate to; to touch; as, an argument does not regard the question; -- often used impersonally; as, I agree with you as regards this or that.

Regard (v. t.) That view of the mind which springs from perception of value, estimable qualities, or anything that excites admiration; respect; esteem; reverence; affection; as, to have a high regard for a person; -- often in the plural.

Renard (n.) A fox; -- so called in fables or familiar tales, and in poetry.

Repand (a.) Having a slightly undulating margin; -- said of leaves.

Retard (v. t.) To keep delaying; to continue to hinder; to prevent from progress; to render more slow in progress; to impede; to hinder; as, to retard the march of an army; to retard the motion of a ship; -- opposed to accelerate.

Retardation (n.) The act of retarding; hindrance; the act of delaying; as, the retardation of the motion of a ship; -- opposed to acceleration.

Retardation (n.) The keeping back of an approaching consonant chord by prolonging one or more tones of a previous chord into the intermediate chord which follows; -- differing from suspension by resolving upwards instead of downwards.

Reward (v. t.) To give in return, whether good or evil; -- commonly in a good sense; to requite; to recompense; to repay; to compensate.

Ribald (n./) A low, vulgar, brutal, foul-mouthed wretch; a lewd fellow.

Ribaldry (n.) The talk of a ribald; low, vulgar language; indecency; obscenity; lewdness; -- now chiefly applied to indecent language, but formerly, as by Chaucer, also to indecent acts or conduct.

Riband (n.) See Rib-band.

Ribbed (a.) Intercalated with slate; -- said of a seam of coal.

Ritardando (a.) Retarding; -- a direction for slower time; rallentado.

Rugged (n.) Harsh; hard; crabbed; austere; -- said of temper, character, and the like, or of persons.

Rugged (n.) Rough to the ear; harsh; grating; -- said of sound, style, and the like.

Rugged (n.) Sour; surly; frowning; wrinkled; -- said of looks, etc.

Rugged (n.) Violent; rude; boisterrous; -- said of conduct, manners, etc.

Rugged (n.) Vigorous; robust; hardy; -- said of health, physique, etc.

Scaled (a.) Covered with scales, or scalelike structures; -- said of a fish, a reptile, a moth, etc.

Scorodite (n.) A leek-green or brownish mineral occurring in orthorhombic crystals. It is a hydrous arseniate of iron.

Seamed (a.) Out of condition; not in good condition; -- said of a hawk.

Second (n.) The second part in a concerted piece; -- often popularly applied to the alto.

Secondary (a.) Subsequent in origin; -- said of minerals produced by alteertion or deposition subsequent to the formation of the original rocks mass; also of characters of minerals (as secondary cleavage, etc.) developed by pressure or other causes.

Secundine (n.) The afterbirth, or placenta and membranes; -- generally used in the plural.

Sexradiate (a.) Having six rays; -- said of certain sponge spicules. See Illust. of Spicule.

Sextodecimo (a.) Having sixteen leaves to a sheet; of, or equal to, the size of one fold of a sheet of printing paper when folded so as to make sixteen leaves, or thirty-two pages; as, a sextodecimo volume.

Sextodecimo (n.) A book composed of sheets each of which is folded into sixteen leaves; hence, indicating, more or less definitely, a size of a book; -- usually written 16mo, or 16?.

Shakedown (n.) A temporary substitute for a bed, as one made on the floor or on chairs; -- perhaps originally from the shaking down of straw for this purpose.

Shield (n.) A broad piece of defensive armor, carried on the arm, -- formerly in general use in war, for the protection of the body. See Buckler.

Shouldered (a.) Having shoulders; -- used in composition; as, a broad-shouldered man.

Shrewd (superl.) Able or clever in practical affairs; sharp in business; astute; sharp-witted; sagacious; keen; as, a shrewd observer; a shrewd design; a shrewd reply.

Smilodon (n.) An extinct genus of saber-toothed tigers. See Mach/rodus.

Souled (a.) Furnished with a soul; possessing soul and feeling; -- used chiefly in composition; as, great-souled Hector.

Sparada (n.) A small California surf fish (Micrometrus aggregatus); -- called also shiner.

Splendiferous (a.) Splendor-bearing; splendid.

Sporades (n. pl.) Stars not included in any constellation; -- called also informed, or unformed, stars.

Spread (v. t.) To divulge; to publish, as news or fame; to cause to be more extensively known; to disseminate; to make known fully; as, to spread a report; -- often acompanied by abroad.

Stayed (a.) Staid; fixed; settled; sober; -- now written staid. See Staid.

Stenodermine (a.) Of or pertaining to the genus Stenoderma, which includes several West Indian and South American nose-leaf bats.

Straddle (v. i.) To stand with the ends staggered; -- said of the spokes of a wagon wheel where they join the hub.

Stupid (a.) Very dull; insensible; senseless; wanting in understanding; heavy; sluggish; in a state of stupor; -- said of persons.

Stupid (a.) Resulting from, or evincing, stupidity; formed without skill or genius; dull; heavy; -- said of things.

Subordinate (n.) One who stands in order or rank below another; -- distinguished from a principal.

Suicide (adv.) The act of taking one's own life voluntary and intentionally; self-murder; specifically (Law), the felonious killing of one's self; the deliberate and intentional destruction of one's own life by a person of years of discretion and of sound mind.

Suicide (adv.) One guilty of self-murder; a felo-de-se.

Suicidism (n.) The quality or state of being suicidal, or self-murdering.

Superdominant (n.) The sixth tone of the scale; that next above the dominant; -- called also submediant.

Swayed (a.) Bent down, and hollow in the back; sway-backed; -- said of a horse.

Tamandu (n.) A small ant-eater (Tamandua tetradactyla) native of the tropical parts of South America.

Taurid (n.) Any of a group of meteors appearing November 20-23; -- so called because they appear to radiate from a point in Taurus.

Testudo (n.) A kind of musical instrument. a species of lyre; -- so called in allusion to the lyre of Mercury, fabled to have been made of the shell of a tortoise.

Tetard (n.) A gobioid fish (Eleotris gyrinus) of the Southern United States; -- called also sleeper.

Tetradecane (n.) A light oily hydrocarbon, C14H30, of the marsh-gas series; -- so called from the fourteen carbon atoms in the molecule.

Tetradymite (n.) A telluride of bismuth. It is of a pale steel-gray color and metallic luster, and usually occurs in foliated masses. Called also telluric bismuth.

Thenadays (adv.) At that time; then; in those days; -- correlative to nowadays.

Thewed (a.) Furnished with thews or muscles; as, a well-thewed limb.

Tomcod (n.) A small edible American fish (Microgadus tomcod) of the Codfish family, very abundant in autumn on the Atlantic coast of the Northen United States; -- called also frostfish. See Illust. under Frostfish.

Torpedo (n.) A kind of small submarine boat carrying an explosive charge, and projected from a ship against another ship at a distance, or made self-propelling, and otherwise automatic in its action against a distant ship.

Torpedo (n.) A kind of detonating cartridge or shell placed on a rail, and exploded when crushed under the locomotive wheels, -- used as an alarm signal.

Trifid (a.) Cleft to the middle, or slightly beyond the middle, into three parts; three-cleft.

Tripod (n.) A three-legged frame or stand, usually jointed at top, for supporting a theodolite, compass, telescope, camera, or other instrument.

Tripodian (n.) An ancient stringed instrument; -- so called because, in form, it resembled the Delphic tripod.

Turbid (a.) Having the lees or sediment disturbed; roiled; muddy; thick; not clear; -- used of liquids of any kind; as, turbid water; turbid wine.

Turgid (a.) Distended beyond the natural state by some internal agent or expansive force; swelled; swollen; bloated; inflated; tumid; -- especially applied to an enlarged part of the body; as, a turgid limb; turgid fruit.

Unbending (a.) Not bending; not suffering flexure; not yielding to pressure; stiff; -- applied to material things.

Unbending (a.) Unyielding in will; not subject to persuasion or influence; inflexible; resolute; -- applied to persons.

Unbending (a.) Unyielding in nature; unchangeable; fixed; -- applied to abstract ideas; as, unbending truths.

Unbred (a.) Not taught or trained; -- with to.

Unbred (a.) Not well-bred; ill-bred.

Underdo (v. i.) To do less than is requisite or proper; -- opposed to overdo.

Underdo (v. t.) To do less thoroughly than is requisite; specifically, to cook insufficiently; as, to underdo the meat; -- opposed to overdo.

Unstudied (a.) Not skilled; unversed; -- followed by in.

Upland (n.) High land; ground elevated above the meadows and intervals which lie on the banks of rivers, near the sea, or between hills; land which is generally dry; -- opposed to lowland, meadow, marsh, swamp, interval, and the like.

Upwards (adv.) In a direction from lower to higher; toward a higher place; in a course toward the source or origin; -- opposed to downward; as, to tend or roll upward.

Veranda (n.) An open, roofed gallery or portico, adjoining a dwelling house, forming an out-of-door sitting room. See Loggia.

Voiced (a.) Uttered with voice; pronounced with vibrations of the vocal cords; sonant; -- said of a sound uttered with the glottis narrowed.

Voided (a.) Having the inner part cut away, or left vacant, a narrow border being left at the sides, the tincture of the field being seen in the vacant space; -- said of a charge.

Washed (a.) Appearing as if overlaid with a thin layer of different color; -- said of the colors of certain birds and insects.

Wicked (a.) Having a wick; -- used chiefly in composition; as, a two-wicked lamp.

Wicked (a.) Evil in principle or practice; deviating from morality; contrary to the moral or divine law; addicted to vice or sin; sinful; immoral; profligate; -- said of persons and things; as, a wicked king; a wicked woman; a wicked deed; wicked designs.

Witted (a.) Having (such) a wit or understanding; as, a quick-witted boy.

Wooled (a.) Having (such) wool; as, a fine-wooled sheep.

Wormed (a.) Penetrated by worms; injured by worms; worm-eaten; as, wormed timber.

Xiphidium (n.) A genus of plants of the order Haemodraceae, having two-ranked, sword-shaped leaves.

Xyloidin (n.) A substance resembling pyroxylin, obtained by the action of nitric acid on starch; -- called also nitramidin.

About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.